NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


9 results for Our State Vol. 68 Issue 3, Aug 2000
Currently viewing results 1 - 9
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
4682
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor J. C. B. Ehringhaus accomplished many things during the Great Depression, including the state takeover of public schools. His means of transportation was another story. During the hard times he made do with a 4-year-old Lincoln with a 190,000 miles on its speedometer. He achieved national fame, however, when his car broke down on the way to Fayetteville to make a speech, and he had to hitchhike 25 miles to arrive on time. He was known all over the country as America's number-one thumbing governor.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4687
Author(s):
Abstract:
To protect the environment and deal with swine waste, Johnston County farmer Julian Barham turned to technology for solutions. The farm handles 4,000 sows, and hog waste is collected in a two-acre, twenty-feet deep lagoon. Technology allows methane gas collection to generate electricity and provide warm water to heat the farm's 7,500 tomato plant greenhouses. Other byproducts include reusable water for the farm and carbon dioxide for the greenhouses.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4688
Author(s):
Abstract:
Road building held a low priority in North Carolina until the beginning of the 20th-century. The implementation of Rural Free Delivery (RFD), the North Carolina Good Roads Association, and the affordable Model T Ford made road construction a necessity. During the 1920s, through the efforts of Gov. Cameron Morrison and State Highway Commission Chairman, Frank Page, the state became nationally known for its outstanding highway system.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4689
Author(s):
Abstract:
Conditions in Scotland in the 1700s, including the start of sheep raising, changes in the hierarchy of clans, and uniting England and Scotland, encouraged many to seek a new life in North Carolina. By the late 18th-century, the largest population of Scots outside Scotland lived in the state. Their history is remembered yearly in the Grandfather Mountain Highland Games and Gathering of the Scottish Clans. Ancestry can be traced through libraries, courthouses, and the Scottish Heritage Center at St. Andrews Presbyterian College.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 3, Aug 2000, p72-77, 79, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
4686
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raptors are birds of prey, including eagles, owls, and hawks. These predators sit at the top of the ornithological food chain, and their health is important to the chain's overall health. Each year thousands of these injured birds are rehabilitated and released through raptor centers across the country. The Carolina Raptor Center, one of the nation's finest facilities, is located on the Latta Plantation Nature Center near Charlotte.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 3, Aug 2000, p46-52, 54, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
4683
Author(s):
Abstract:
U.S. Highway 64, which stretches 613.69 miles across North Carolina from Manteo to Murphy, didn't exist until 1932. It begins at Whalebone on the Outer Banks (elevation: 9 feet) and reaches its highest level at Highlands (elevation: 4,118 feet). In between these points travelers find the essence of the state -- its history, crafts, food, scenery, and people.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4685
Author(s):
Abstract:
Oriental, located in Pamlico County, was a thriving port city in the early 1900s. With a population now of 800, this city that was named for a sunken ship calls itself \"The Sailing Capital of the Carolinas.\" Oriental attracts people who enjoy sailing and an easygoing lifestyle. Comer relates the town's history and describes the community's landscape and attitudes.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 3, Aug 2000, p20-21, 23-25 Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
4704
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Linville and a son, who were murdered in 1776 while exploring an area in Western Carolina the Cherokees called the \"River of Cliffs,\" have left their name on several scenic areas - Linville Falls, Linville Gorge, Linville River, and Linville Caverns. Every years thousands of tourists visit and enjoy these wildly beautiful areas.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
4705
Author(s):
Abstract:
A generation before Daniel Boone, frontiersman William Linville blazed trails west. In 1776, Linville and his son John were killed by Cherokees. His name remains alive today through the Linville Gorge Wilderness Area in the Pisgah National Forest.
Source:
Full Text: