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4 results for North Carolina Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 2005
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Record #:
7384
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Wright discusses the art museums located on the state's college and university campuses. In October 2005, Duke University will unveil its new Nasher Museum of Art. At UNC-Chapel Hill, the Ackland Art Museum has doubled its exhibition space. Wake Forest University has an extensive collection of American art, and North Carolina A&T has large collections of African and African American art. The museums are usually free or charge a small admission.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p25-26, il
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Record #:
7383
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Abstract:
P. Anthony Zeiss became the third president of Central Piedmont Community College in Charlotte in 1992. Prior to assuming this position, he was vice president of instruction and president of Pueblo Community College in Pueblo, Colorado. Zeiss has authored several books and films and is a professional speaker and lecturer. Zeiss is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p20, 22, 24, il
Record #:
7382
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Scenic byways take travelers off the fast paced interstate roads and onto less congested, unhurried ones. The byways give travelers an opportunity to explore every corner of North Carolina. Wright describes some byways found in the mountain, piedmont, and coastal areas.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p14-19, il
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Record #:
7385
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's fifty-eight community colleges prepare workers for jobs in existing industries and for the jobs of the future. There is a campus practically within a thirty-minute drive of every state citizen. The community college system had 158,000 students enrolled in distance learning programs in 2004, and another 800,000 students took at least one course on campus. Maurer discusses some of the more unusual course offerings, including aquaculture and marine science, aviation, court reporting and captioning, crime scene investigation, cyberscience investigation, culinary technology and hospitality, and nanotechnology.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 9, Sept 2005, p54, 56-64, 66-67, il
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