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9 results for North Carolina Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005
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Record #:
7482
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biotechnology is the most coveted industry in the world, and competition to attract it is very high. For the past two years North Carolina has ranked third in the nation in biotechnology, trailing California and Massachusetts. Efforts to strengthen the state's industry are well underway. “Jobs Across North Carolina” is a strategic plan for spreading biotechnology statewide, and indications are that many of the plan's goals are being met. Goals include offering tax breaks and other economic incentives to bring new biomanufacturing businesses and help existing ones to expand. Maurer discusses a number of biotechnology operations throughout North Carolina.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p12, 14, 16-19, 21-24, 26-30, il
Record #:
7481
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Leslie Alexandre is president and CEO of the North Carolina Biotechnology Center, which is located in the Research Triangle Park. The center was created in 1984 by Governor James B. Hunt. Alexandre came to the center in 2002 and is helping North Carolina attain new heights in an industry where it already excels. Many state leaders give Alexandre much credit for helping the state become the third leading biotechnology state in the nation in terms of companies and employees. Alexandre is featured in this month's NORTH CAROLINA magazine executive profile.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p57-61, por
Record #:
7478
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina will become the first state in the nation to create a 21st century skills center. The center will be part of the N.C. Business Committee for Education, a nonprofit housed in the governor's office. The center will focus on helping students acquire the knowledge and ability needed for success in the global economy. The center's activities will include curriculum design, teacher training, and student assessment.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p6, il
Record #:
7479
Author(s):
Abstract:
Changes now taking place in downtown Raleigh will transform the city's skyline in the spring of 2006. A public/private investment of over $1 billion in development will include a redesigned Fayetteville Street and a new, state-of-the-art convention center. Planners want more restaurants and activities downtown to appeal to locals as well as the individuals the center will bring in.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p8, il
Record #:
7483
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alamance Community College in Graham pioneered specialized biotech training. The program started in 1985, and for seventeen years it was the state's only program. Alamance has graduated 165 people in the program since 1985, and the graduates have a 90 percent hiring rate in biotech jobs. Alamance is now part of the community college system's BioWorks program, although it retains its own curriculum.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p20, il
Record #:
7480
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's food producers are expanding their products to many parts of the world. Wright discusses a number of companies and their products, including Carolina Cookie Company, Mt. Olive Pickle Company, Smithfield Foods, Atkinson Milling Company, and Bertie County Peanuts.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p54-56, il
Record #:
7510
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wright discusses the role Coastal Carolina Community College plays in attracting businesses to Onslow County. The college has an economic development team, which includes top-level representatives from the chamber of commerce, the sports commission, the military base, and the office of economic development. This group coordinates meetings between the county and interested businesses. The college's Center for Business and Industry Development is an essential part of planning an incentive package. The Industry Training and Small Business Center designs training programs for companies. The North Carolina Military Business Center helps match potential business partners with military business opportunities.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p40, il
Record #:
7508
Author(s):
Abstract:
This special NORTH CAROLINA magazine community profile supplement features Onslow County. The Marine Corps forms the foundation of the county's economy, contributing an annual $2.8 billion and employing more than 4,600 civilians. A growing tourism market and an agricultural tradition also contribute to the economy. As tobacco has declined, a number of farmers have turned to agritourism. The county is also attractive to retirees and new businesses, such as Wal-Mart, Home Depot, and Best Buy.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p33-34, 37-39, 41-44, il
Record #:
7509
Author(s):
Abstract:
The seven-story Onslow Memorial Hospital is the county's tallest building and only civilian hospital. The hospital offers a wide range of health care to the community, and all of its departments have high service demands. In 2006, a $140 - $150 million expansion will begin to meet the following needs: expanded emergency room space, updated surgical facilities, and a new patient tower with multi-purpose private rooms.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 11, Nov 2005, p36, il