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8 results for North Carolina Literary Review Vol. Issue 5, 1996
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Record #:
6221
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Caverly and Wade catalog small magazines and literary journals published in North Carolina. A section of new publications is included, as well as updates on current publications and a list of magazines that have ceased publication.
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Record #:
6226
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Patterson continues his series profiling North Carolina writers as well as those who have written in and about the state. Included in this latest installment are Julie Fay, Julia Fields, John Hope Franklin, and Kaye Gibbons.
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Record #:
21076
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Broadsides were a cheap and easy way to circulate songs and poetry amongst large groups of people during and after the American Civil War. This was the case of the broadside ballad, Shelling of Fort Anderson, March 14th, 1863 by Dr. Sutherland, a 46-year-old physician and private in the 92nd New York Volunteer Regiment which occupied Fort Anderson in New Bern, North Carolina. The ballad poetically describes the assault on the fort by Confederate besiegers and the Union defense. The broadside also provides a unique perspective on a well-known military action during the Civil War.
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North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. Issue 5, 1996, p178-188, por, map Periodical Website
Record #:
21073
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Publisher David Clark was an unofficial spokesman for the textile industry during much of his life. An American success story, Clark began working in the textile industry as a sweeper before gaining multiple engineering degrees which he applied to the running of textile mills. Clark was also an organizer of the Southern Textile Association and owner of the Southern Textile Bulletin, a weekly magazine that went out to thousands of textile workers throughout the South.
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Record #:
21072
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Ethel Thomas was a North Carolina author who wrote under the pen name, 'Aunt Becky,' and published in the Charlotte area during the first half of the 19th century. Thomas wrote fictional accounts about the Southern textile industry which was a large economic cog of the Charlotte area. Publisher David Clark, owner of the Southern Textile Bulletin, reprinted several of Thomas' novels in his magazine as well as put 'Aunt Becky' in a weekly column where she served up folksy success stories, advice, news, descriptions of Southern mill towns she had visited.
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Record #:
21075
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In this speech conducted during the Carders' Meeting in Anderson, South Carolina on April 16, 1931, Southern columnist Ethel Thomas, under her pen name Aunt Becky, answers a variety of questions from participants of the meeting. She also described in colorful detail her trip to Anderson and the lack of interest people have shown in the Textile Association.
Record #:
21074
Author(s):
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In these excerpts from early 20th century columnist Ethel Thomas, also known under her pen name 'Aunt Becky,' she dispenses advice on a variety of topics to textile workers from around the South. These topics include her views on beauty, cursing, uniforms, and conspicuous absence.
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Record #:
21077
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When Black Mountain College closed down in 1957, its library collection was sold to the newly opened North Carolina Wesleyan College and is currently the centerpiece of Wesleyan's Black Mountain College collection. The correspondence between the Charles Olson, Black Mountain's last rector and Jasper Smith, Wesleyan's first business manager details the negotiations that took place to put the collection in Wesleyan's hands. The collection at North Carolina Wesleyan contains over 5,000 books and was not fully curated until the mid-1970s.
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