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14 results for Textile industry--North Carolina
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Record #:
13895
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The living conditions of employees in the textile mills in North Carolina have undergone great changes in the last two decades.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 4, June 1950, p3-4, 17, f
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Record #:
14286
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Lesesne begins the article with an abbreviated history of mills in the United States, typically in the Northeast. The article focuses on attempts to establish the industry in the South with the earliest mills being built in South Carolina. The first mill in North Carolina was built in Lincolnton. The author discusses the successes and hardships faced by mill owners.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 23, Nov 1948, p3-5, 17, il
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Record #:
21073
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Publisher David Clark was an unofficial spokesman for the textile industry during much of his life. An American success story, Clark began working in the textile industry as a sweeper before gaining multiple engineering degrees which he applied to the running of textile mills. Clark was also an organizer of the Southern Textile Association and owner of the Southern Textile Bulletin, a weekly magazine that went out to thousands of textile workers throughout the South.
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Record #:
22783
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Until recent decades, North Carolina had a thriving textile industry. Since the 1990s and the signing of NAFTA, textile work has been outsourced overseas to Third World countries like Bangladesh. Some argue that the Rana Plaza tragedy in April of 2013 is directly related to outsourcing, while others argue it is part of the natural evolution of the economy in developing nations. Such tragedies have inspired some Carolinians to establish Carolina-made fabric and clothing lines like TS Designs' \"Cotton of the Carolinas\" T-shirt line.
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Record #:
24294
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Shelby Yarn Inc. in Shelby, North Carolina shut down in January 2000 and 650 people lost their jobs. This article presents Max Gardener III and how he helped blow the whistle on the various nefarious undertakings of the mill owner, Sidney Kosann.
Record #:
24336
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The Kier brothers operate Lida Inc., a Charlotte-based maker of polyester stretch fabrics that employs about 600 people in Mecklenburg and Gaston counties. The brothers chose to take their business public, which allowed them to reap a twenty million dollar payout but caused stock shares to lose half their value.
Record #:
24385
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Textile/Clothing Technology Corp. is a company that hopes to save U.S. apparel makers from faltering productivity and sales. Using innovation and equipment modernization, the company hopes to bolster the nation’s manufacturers, which have been suffering as a result of outsourcing and rising imports.
Record #:
22641
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In the 1990s, North Carolina employed more than 176,000 workers in nearly 1400 textile mills; however, by 2013, 80 percent of those jobs were lost. Since the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), textile firms became outsource to other countries like Bangladesh.
Record #:
29367
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North Carolina's export industry is still booming--despite hindrances in Europe and the Middle East--thanks to textiles and apparel. Textile mill exports were up 30% to $138 million, while apparel increased 45.8% to $80 million.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 11, Nov 1991, p32, il
Record #:
30326
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In total volume and number of people employed, the textile manufacturing industry is the number one manufacturing business in North Carolina. There are over 1100 plants engaged in textile manufacturing, and they are valued at over $657 million.
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Record #:
31414
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For generations, the textile industry has been a bulwark in North Carolina's economy. As it continues to grow, it continues to be a major factor in the development of the state. North Carolina leads the nation in production of textile products, up a total of 52 new textile plants in just one year.
Record #:
32340
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Former North Carolina Senator, Charles H. Reynolds, is the president and chief executive officer of Spindale Mills, Inc. and Cherokee Textile Mills. Reynolds and other textile leaders are fighting against economic repression. This article discusses Reynolds background in politics and business, and presents his views on the challenges facing North Carolina’s textile industry.
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Record #:
32938
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Robert C. Schroeder is president of the Charlotte-based Celanese Fibers Operations. In this article, Schroeder discusses how imports are the major problem facing the man-made fiber industry and the textile industry. These industries are making themselves more cost-competitive by improving technology and automating production.
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Record #:
32956
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North Carolina textile and furniture industries are competing with low-cost imports from Asia. As the state’s largest manufacturing employer, the textile industry’s future is directly tied in with the economic future of North Carolina. The trade deficit has accounted for textile-related industry plant closings and permanent employee layoffs.
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