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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 65 Issue 2, Apr 1988
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Record #:
21511
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Harry Golden was a famous author, lecturer, and civil rights advocate in the late 1950s. His fame brought much scrutiny to his past when a 1929 fraud conviction was brought into public light. His conviction, the result of shady stock market deal, led to a four year sentence in federal prison. While this did not harm Golden's new career, the original trial had damaged the career of Methodist bishop James Cannon who had been taken in by Golden's fake stock firm. In the 1928 election, Cannon had campaigned against anti-prohibitionist Al Smith and in retaliation, Senator Carter Glass used the scandal to weaken Cannon's political clout and moral authority.
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Record #:
21512
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Leading up to the American Revolution, a document authored by the anonymous 'Musquetoe' was released that caricatured and satirized the leading Whigs and Tories of the Lower Cape Fear River Valley in North Carolina. The document exposed how the region exhibited many of the same strains found in other regions of the colony that had already escalated into open conflict. A large conflict was between the merchant class who had recently attained gentry status and therefore remained in the Loyalist camp, and the planters who resented the rise of merchants and were more often Whigs.
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Record #:
21510
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sometime before 1824, the slave celebration of Jonkonnu spread to North Carolina from the Caribbean Islands. Jonkonnu is a unique Christmas celebration in which elaborate costumes are worn and distinctive dances are danced to celebrate the holiday. The tradition was transplanted to America with Caribbean slaves and became a custom in black communities until about 1900 when it was abandoned by African-Americans.
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