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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Rankin, Richard
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Record #:
1376
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Abstract:
Dr. Rankin's discussion, the elegiac poem itself, and an introduction by editor Susan Block combine to shed light on both the southern elegiac tradition and on Adam Boyd, founder of Wilmington's first newspaper, Revolutionary War soldier, and clergyman.
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Record #:
19991
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In the colonial era, wit and humor was often the spontaneous product of active social discourse and usually were passed around as handwritten manuscripts through social classes. The wit and humor of the Lower Cape Fear originated as a way of communicating private and social pleasure throughout the region. Wilmington native Johnson Jones Hooper, a local humorist, was the first to transition from British style satire to the original American humor that would make him famous.
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Record #:
21397
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A reprint of the surviving documents of the Ninepenny Whist Club, a private social organization founded by 13 men in Wilmington in 1801 to eat, drink, and be merry. The documents that survive from the group consist of election results (from a group presidential election, a constitution, resolutions, several addresses and responses, and the transcript of a mock trial - all providing a glimpse of club life and on social life in Wilmington in the early 19th century.
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Record #:
21512
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Leading up to the American Revolution, a document authored by the anonymous 'Musquetoe' was released that caricatured and satirized the leading Whigs and Tories of the Lower Cape Fear River Valley in North Carolina. The document exposed how the region exhibited many of the same strains found in other regions of the colony that had already escalated into open conflict. A large conflict was between the merchant class who had recently attained gentry status and therefore remained in the Loyalist camp, and the planters who resented the rise of merchants and were more often Whigs.
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Record #:
18050
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Abstract:
Rick Neisler, president of Oakland Plantation Turf Farm, owns a 9,000-acre private hunting preserve in Bladen County. Rankin describes bear hunting there.
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