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12 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 47 Issue 2, Mid-Winter 2000
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Record #:
4992
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Abstract:
Walter and Ray Davenport of Tyrrell County received a 1999 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for being representative of a community's traditional reliance on water and the work of their own hands. The Davenports have fished local waters since the 1950s and are known for their skill in using pound nets. Hemming describes their life on the waters and knowledge acquired after nearly fifty years as fishermen.
Record #:
5157
Abstract:
Bishop Dready Manning felt called to give up playing the blues and use his musical gifts \"towards God's service.\" In the 1960s he founded St. Mark Holiness Church in rural Halifax county, where he has preached and kept the \"old-time sound alive in his church.\" He received the 1999 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for outstanding commitment to his music and his ministry.
Record #:
5161
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lena Sanders Ritter is a woman of the coastal water, one of seven generations of her family to work the water and farmland in south Onslow County. She received a 1999 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for her leadership \"in protecting this state's rich coastal resources\" and for her role \"in preserving and protecting the cultural traditions of her community.\"
Record #:
36320
Author(s):
Abstract:
A local adaptation of the vanishing hitchhiker ghost story from Guilford County, N.C. The ghost is named Lydia, and she haunts the road underneath Jamestown Bridge, trying to hitch a ride with passing motorists. Lydia’s origin story has several variations, all having to do with a car accident near the bridge: either she was on the way to a high school dance and her car wrecked, or she committed suicide at the bridge where her decreased boyfriend had been in an accident and died. The bridge underpass is now covered in various graffiti, some of which pertain to Lydia.
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Record #:
36322
Author(s):
Abstract:
A wedding dress, purchased in 1940, was worn by several generations of Ergenbright women, from the grandmothers wedding in 1941 to the authors wedding in 1997. Each woman kept the dress fundamentally the same, making only minor changes for sizing and style. The dress conveyed familial love and sentimentality.
Record #:
36319
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Kooner signifies the connection between Africa and the shore that African slaves landed on. The masked tradition remains a tribute to African-European-American Indian-Caribbean peoples.
Record #:
36323
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Abstract:
Fascinated with music as a child, David Harrell made a barn to provide a hospitable meeting place where musicians can maintain and add to their musical skill, as well as act as a social gathering.
Record #:
36316
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Abstract:
In West African building folklore has been discovered in several North Carolinian structures. West African spiritualism was a vital component of a slave’s personal history and character.
Record #:
36318
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Abstract:
Because of a resurgence of interest in the topic, this article was reprinted from an earlier journal (See 19.4 1971:160-172).
Record #:
36324
Abstract:
The Huffmans are collectors of folk art who bring important appreciations, interactions, and study that go beyond simple acquisition.
Record #:
36327
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mr. Zug conducted research on pottery traditions and has helped enrich the understanding of this art tradition through publications, talks, and personal encouragement, as well as helping potters gain local and national recognition for their art.
Record #:
36325
Abstract:
Ms. Peterson has gained the Brown Hudson Award for her contribution to folkloric exhibitions.