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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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42 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 44 Issue 1 & 2, 1997
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Record #:
5565
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Emma Taylor creates baskets in the tradition of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Specializing in white oak basketry, her creations are both functional and beautiful. In 1989, she received an N.C. Folk Heritage Award.
Record #:
5564
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Walter and Dorothy Auman received a 1989 Folk Heritage Award for contributions to the Seagrove pottery tradition. They also worked with the state to promote Seagrove potters and participated in archaeological digs.
Record #:
5566
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With parents and seven siblings all musical, Etta Baker of Caldwell County, a 1989 Folk Heritage Award winner, just naturally followed along. Mastering the six- and twelve-string guitar, she performs a blues style popular at the turn of the century.
Record #:
5573
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Sisters Effie Rhodes Bell and Hazel Rhodes Reece have made quilts for over fifty years, creating original designs or using traditional patterns. Featured in national publications and exhibits, they received an N.C. Folk Heritage Award in 1991.
Record #:
5571
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Eva Wolfe is one of only ten people who practice the rare art of weaving traditional Cherokee rivercane baskets. She is also known for her doubleweave baskets, one of the most difficult weaving styles. In 1989, she received an N.C. Folk heritage Award.
Record #:
5574
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At age 103, Sally Parnell of Davidson County has been a rag rug weaver for almost 95 years. When her husband died, she needed to make a living. Rug sales gave her skills greater prominence. In 1990, she received an N.C. Folk Heritage Award.
Record #:
5568
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Benton Flippen of Surry County is an innovator in the art of fiddling. His style and creativity, along with Earnest East and others, has brought national recognition to the Mt. Airy locale. In 1990, he received a North Carolina Folk Heritage Award.
Record #:
5567
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Rags, reels, and spirituals heard at home and in the community were foundations of Thomas Burt's career as a blues musician in Durham from the 1920s through the 1980s. In 1989, he received a North Carolina Folk Heritage Award.
Record #:
5575
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Wilma McNabb of Cherokee County received a 1990 N.C. Folk Heritage Award for preserving the art of overshot pattern weaving. Almost lost at the start of the 20th century, it is done on a large wooden loom and demands great technical knowledge and skill.
Record #:
5569
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Connie, Cleonia, and Celester Badgett learned to harmonize under their father's direction. They sing in the jubilee style, a form popular in the 1930s and 1940s. They received a 1990 N.C. Folk Heritage Award for continuing the gospel tradition.
Record #:
5570
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Walter Calhoun was awarded a 1990 N.C. Folk Heritage Award for preserving and teaching the ancient ceremonial arts and customs of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians.
Record #:
5572
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Born in Madison County, Thomas Hunter is a master fiddler who preserves the traditional western Carolina fiddle tunes. Recognized by the Smithsonian Institution for his work, he has also received a 1989 N.C. Folk Heritage Award.
Record #:
5579
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Joe and Odell Thompson of Alamance County received a 1991 N.C. Folk Heritage Award for continuing the African-American stringband tradition. The cousins play banjo and fiddle together, a combination that once provided much of the South's dance music.
Record #:
5577
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quay Smathers of Haywood County was awarded a 1991 N.C. Folk Heritage Award for playing, singing, and preserving western Carolina traditional music. He is a leader in preserving and popularizing the shape note style of singing.
Record #:
5584
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Abstract:
Lela Brooks used her skills as a tobacco stringer to learn the art of crochet needlework. Using available material - cotton tobacco twine - she creates intricate designs on bedspreads and other items. In 1991, she received a N.C. Folk Heritage Award.