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10 results for Potters--Seagrove
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Record #:
2017
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Seagrove potter Phil Morgan is one of only a few of America's 30,000 potters who work with crystalline glazes, a rare craft that originated in China around 500 AD.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 7, Dec 1994, p14-15, il
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Record #:
3178
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Charlie Boyd Craven's family was one of the oldest of the Seagrove pottery clans, and he was its last active member. His years of work, 1919-1942 and 1971-1991, were separated, yet when he began again, his pottery still reflected the traditional ways.
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Record #:
3617
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Ben Owen III is a third-generation potter in Seagrove. Taught by his grandfather, Ben Owen Sr., one of the state's best-known potters, Owen's creations are collected by many and exhibited in museums at home and abroad.
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Record #:
5564
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Walter and Dorothy Auman received a 1989 Folk Heritage Award for contributions to the Seagrove pottery tradition. They also worked with the state to promote Seagrove potters and participated in archaeological digs.
Record #:
5601
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Vernon Owens of Moore County was born into his family's pottery tradition and was making salable pottery by age ten. He creates both in traditional and newer forms. Since 1960, he has worked at Jugtown. In 1994, he received a North Carolina Folk Heritage Award for his contribution to the pottery tradition.
Record #:
7035
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Ben Owen III is a third-generation Seagrove potter, who knew at age twelve that he wanted to make pottery his career. Taught by his grandfather, Ben Owen, Sr., one of the state's best-known potters, Owen's creations are collected by many and exhibited in museums at home and abroad.
Record #:
12417
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Sidney Luck is a fifth-generation potter who carries on the traditions of generations of potters who have inhabited the Seagrove area. The family is known for producing salt-glazed pottery. He is a recipient of a 2009 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award presented by the North Carolina Folklore Society.
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Record #:
18732
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Jugtown Pottery, a Seagrove tradition, is almost one hundred years old. Turner discusses two of the families who have kept it alive, the Busbees and the Owens, and how knowledge of the pottery spread beyond the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 9, Feb 2013, p98-102, 104, 106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24173
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Potters in Seagrove, Randolph County, discuss the exceptional quality of the clay found in North Carolina. Celebration of Seagrove potters will hold a festival to highlight the craftsmanship of local potters.
Record #:
11884
Abstract:
Sid Luck is a fifth-generation potter who carries on the traditions of generations of potters who have inhabited the Seagrove area. The family is known for producing salt-glazed pottery. Zug discusses his work and creations.
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