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5 results for Journal of the New Bern Historical Society Vol. 4 Issue 2, Nov 1991
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Record #:
27891
Abstract:
During World War II, the construction of an air station at Cherry Point was instrumental in transforming New Bern from a military living space into a nourishing community. New Bern became “Your Liberty Town”, profiled in a 1943 North Carolina guide book as a relaxing home away from home.
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Record #:
27894
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Abstract:
The New Bern Academy is one of the few remaining Federal-style public buildings in North Carolina, and the first school in the state to have been established by law. Founded in 1764, it ranks as one of the oldest secondary schools in the nation. The building became a museum in 1990 and exhibits the history of New Bern.
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Record #:
27892
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Abstract:
After the Civil War, Reverend Edwin M. Forbes, a New Bern native, established an independent black congregation at St. Cyprian’s Church. In 1922, New Bern suffered a disastrous fire which burned mostly in black residential areas. The fire pointed out the need for a hospital for blacks, leading to the establishment of Good Shepherd Hospital.
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Record #:
27890
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Abstract:
Mary Bayard Morgan Wootten was a New Bern artist and photographer in the early 1900s. Wootten took some of the earliest aerial photographs in North Carolina, and many of her photographs were made into murals in both private homes and public buildings including the governor’s office.
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Record #:
36145
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Abstract:
His memories lasted for the war’s duration, from his enlistment at 17 to release from service in July 1865. His military service included the Battle of New Bern (1862); encampment at Goldsboro; imprisonments at Fort Delaware and Point Lookout. Alluded was how religion and humor helped to soften the otherwise hard experience of combat. Harshness not hinted were the economic fallout of Reconstruction for the South and life on his family’s plantation.