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10 results for Indy Week Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017
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Record #:
28982
Abstract:
Wildin Acosta is well-known among the Latino and undocumented immigrant community in Durham. Acosta’s case is among at least six in North Carolina involving high-school-age immigrants who could qualify as refugees but instead were detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement last spring. All have been released, and they are now seeking asylum and advocating for immigrants.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p19-21, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28981
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Widely publicized immigration sweeps, anti-immigrant rhetoric on the state and national levels, and a stream of proposed new laws targeting the undocumented have put immigrants in North Carolina at unease. In Wake County, undocumented residents question whether to report crimes because doing so might lead to their deportation.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p16-18, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28978
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In 1883, the poet Emma Lazarus imagined the Statue of Liberty as the lamp beside the golden door, an expression of how America imagined itself. But the nation’s relationship with immigrants has never been that simple, and is an even more complicated issue today. With the new presidency, Latin American immigrants in North Carolina question their future.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p6-8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
28980
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In 1997, Lilian Cardona and her family fled to North Carolina from Guatemala to escape violence, war, and drugs. With no criminal record, a valid work permit, and a baby due in May, Lilian fears she will be deported under President Trump’s new immigration policies.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p12-14, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28979
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For centuries, North Carolina has leaned on the labor and initiative of immigrants from across the globe. James H. Johnson, a professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler Business School, covers the history and patterns of immigration in North Carolina.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p10-11, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28983
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More than six thousand pastors have signed a letter to President Donald Trump supporting the country’s refugee resettlement program, including almost twenty from North Carolina. Supporters say that loving one’s neighbor and welcoming the stranger are key tenets of Christianity. Durham’s Hope Valley Baptist Church and other volunteers have converted spaces into short-term housing and become mentors for refugees.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p24-25, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28987
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The growing population of Latinos and immigrants in North Carolina is evident in the food industry. However, immigrant cooks, such as Luis Ortega, are rarely acknowledged for their intelligence, creativity, and culinary talents. Ortega came to North Carolina for a better life, but returned to Mexico because he felt invisible as an immigrant cook and feared deportation.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p34-35, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28986
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Refugee Community Partnership (RCP), a grassroots advocacy organization in Carrboro, helps facilitate legal assistance for refugees. Andrea Eisen, RCP's cofounder, says the only way to provide these refugees all that they need is a grassroots movement to accomplish things like an increased minimum wage and investment in affordable housing.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p32-33, por Periodical Website
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28985
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Gail Phares is the Triangle-based cofounder of the Raleigh-based organization Witness for Peace Southeast, which advocates for peace, justice, and sustainable economies in Latin America. In the 1980s, Phares was active in the sanctuary movement, when communities of faith harbored and supported undocumented refugees.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p30-31, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
28984
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An estimated twenty thousand fled religious and political persecution in Vietnam and found a new home in North Carolina. An indigenous community comprising about thirty tribal groups, they're often referred to as the Montagnards, a term meaning "mountain people”. Today, North Carolina is home to the largest Montagnard community outside of Vietnam.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 10, March 2017, p28-29, por Periodical Website
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