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19 results for Carolina Trees & Branches Vol. 25 Issue No. 3, July 2016
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Record #:
38916
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Abstract:
John Harvey, a native of Perquimans County, NC, served as a representative from Perquimans County, a Justice in 1751, and as Speaker of the Assembly. Harvey was considered the ‘Father of the American Revolution in North Carolina.’ He was a member of the first NC Committee of Correspondence and called the first and second Provincial Congresses against the will of the Royal Governor. In 1758, he helped charter the town of Hertford, NC. He was buried at his Belgrade Farm in Perquimans County, NC, but his tomb eventually washed away into the Albemarle Sound.
Record #:
38915
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Andrew Jackson Stedman, a native of Gates County, NC, was a literary magazine publisher in Salem, NC and later in Raleigh, NC, a. First Lieutenant in the Civil War and a lawyer in Pittsboro, NC after the war. In 1870, Stedman published a newspaper in Danberry, NC. He then moved Patrick County, VA in 1873 where he practiced law, published a newspaper and started the apple industry there by planting over 150,000 apple trees. The town of Stedman in Patrick County, VA is named for him.
Record #:
38917
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Porter, a native of Virginia, moved to North Carolina in 1691 and became a prominent political and public figure in the Albemarle region. He was appointed Attorney General in 1694 and was General Court Justice and Speaker of the Assembly in 1697. In 1706, the Albemarle Quakers sent Porter to England to get relief for Quakers from the Lord’s Proprietors. After he returned, Porter got caught up in Cary’s Rebellion and had to flee to England, where he died a short time later.
Record #:
38918
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Abstract:
The author continues the genealogy of the John and Charity Harris family; and the Arthur Pritchard and Ruth Boswell family.
Record #:
38921
Author(s):
Abstract:
Francis Corbin, was a native of England, served as land agent for Earl Granville from 1744-1759. He also served as member of the Council, Judge of the Court of Admiralty, associate Judge of the General Court, Legislator, Justice, and Colonel of Militia. He got caught up in the politics of the day and was removed from his government jobs. His underofficers as land agent made illegal decisions and charged excessive fees and the populace blamed Corbin. In 1759, at what became known as the Enfield Riot, a posse of men from Halifax, Edgecombe and Granville counties captured Corbin and held him in Enfield, NC and required him to give bond for the reform of the proprietary land office. He afterwards represented Chowan County in the General Assembly. The Cupola House in Edenton was built for Corbin and Corbintown, named in honor of Samuel Corbin, was later renamed Hillsborough, NC.
Record #:
38919
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Archdale, a native of England, was a Quaker, first appearing in the colonies from 1664-1666. In 1681, Archdale purchased John Berkeley’s Carolina Proprietorship. In 1683, he went to the Albemarle region of North Carolina to be Collector of Quitrents. In 1694, the Lord’s Proprietors commissioned Archdale as Governor, serving until 1696. He is remembered for introducing rice to the NC colony. Archdale then went to Charlestown, SC to replace the Governor there. Archdale returned to England and died there in 1717. There was an Archdale Precinct in NC from 1705 to 1712, later Bath County. The city of Archdale NC was named for him.
Record #:
38920
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Reed, appears as early as 1711 as an assemblyman signing a letter denouncing Cary’s Rebellion and in 1712, signing a letter petitioning help from the Governor of Virginia against the Tuscarora. In 1712, Reed was a member of the Virginia –North Carolina Boundary Line Commission. In 1715, Reed was named as vestryman for the Currituck Precinct parish. He became Proprietor’s deputy, a member of the Council and was acting Governor of North Carolina from 1722 to 1724. In 1723, he named himself and others as town commissioners to enlarge the town of Carteret, which was recently incorporated on the northeastern side of Roanoke Island. Reed died at his home in Pasquotank County.
Record #:
38924
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Abstract:
Thomas Macknight, a native of Scotland, served in the NC Assembly in 1762, 1771, 1773 and 1775. At the 1775 NC Provincial Congress, Macknight, a Loyalist, who represented Currituck County, refused to sign the Association approving the Continental Congress. Members of the Congress deemed him an object of contempt. Macknight and other members of the Currituck and Pasquotank delegation withdrew from Provincial Congress. Macknight was driven out of North Carolina by violence and fled to Governor Dunmore of Virginia. In early 1776, Macknight paid for part of the defenses around Norfolk, VA, and then went to the Cape Fear region and then fled to England. Macknight made Loyalist claims in North Carolina and Virginia for over 300,000 pounds.
Subject(s):
Record #:
38926
Author(s):
Abstract:
Henry White, Jr. , a native of Isle of Wight, VA, moved to North Carolina in 1663 and later to a plantation on the west side of Little River in Perquimans Precinct, NC. White was a Quaker and was active as an organizer and a lay minister. He served as a Justice on the NC Higher Court and the Precinct County Court. White is remembered for a 302 line poem in rhymed couplet and doggerel verse he wrote in 1698. This is the earliest known literary work of its kind produced in North Carolina.
Record #:
38927
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ben Dixon MacNeill, born near Laurinburg, NC, was a teacher, newspaper writer, a Lt. Colonel in WWII and publicity director for the outdoor drama ‘The Lost Colony.’ He is remembered for his column, ‘Cellar and Garret,’ in the News & Observer and for his novel ‘Sand Roots’ and the book, ‘The Hatterasman' about his personalized account of the people who lived on the Outer Banks.
Record #:
38922
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Abstract:
Lucien Doulas Starke, a native of Virginia, was a newspaper editor in Elizabeth City, NC, a lawyer, and a Colonel in the Confederate Army. After the war, Starke was a lawyer in Norfolk, VA, served two terms in the Virginia legislature, was president of the Landmark Publishing Company and publisher of the Norfolk Landmark.
Record #:
38925
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Abstract:
Thomas Harvey Skinner, a native of Perquimans County, NC, was a Baptist and later became a Presbyterian, a minister and a founder of the Union Theological Seminary in New York City.
Record #:
38923
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Abstract:
The author gives a case for missing Camden County Marriage Bonds. That Superior Court cases shoe evidences of other marriages.
Record #:
38928
Author(s):
Abstract:
Thomas Child, a native of England, became the Attorney General of the NC General Court in 1746. Only after a few months, he went back to England because of the unrest and confusion in North Carolina. Child returned to North Carolina by 1750, along with Francis Corbin, as proprietary agents of Earl Granville. Because of mismanagement by Corbin, Child was named in 1760 as exclusive agent for Lord Granville. He was named as NC Attorney General in 1760 and he cleared up the backlog of delayed land grants and represented Chowan County in the General Assembly. Child resigned as Attorney General due to politics, moved to Virginia and maintained oversight of proprietary affairs until the death of Earl Granville in 1763. Child was able to purchase 100,000 acres from the new proprietor and he sold that land in 1767 to the Moravians. Child disappeared from North Carolina and died in England in the early 1790’s.
Subject(s):
Record #:
38931
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edmund Porter was born in Lower Norfolk County, VA., punished for being in Cary’s Rebellion, left North Carolina and returned to hold numerous posts in the NC government. In 1725, he was named Judge of the NC Admiralty Court and was elected to represent Chowan County in the Assembly. Porter got caught up in rancorous politics and fell in and out of grace with the different NC Governors. In 1733, Porter was elected to the Lower House from Chowan County and in 1734 returned to the NC Council. Porter died suddenly in late 1737.