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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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348 results for "WNC Magazine"
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Record #:
22273
Abstract:
The first broom-making machine went into production in 1845. Prior to that brooms were all handmade, usually from broomcorn. In his workshop at the old general store in Big Sandy Mush in Leicester, NC, Marlow Gates keeps the fine art of broom-making alive and well. He studied design at NC State University then, after graduation, returned home. Gates is one of a hundred or so broom-makers left in the country.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Aug 2012, p22-23, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22271
Abstract:
Dr. Lucius B. Morse purchased Chimney Rock, a 2,280-foot tall, 535 million-year-old monolith, in 1902. Although a stairway to the top had been in use for the previous seventeen years, it was wearing down. Lucas hired Guilford Nanney, a carpenter-builder, to build a new trail system. Before he was hired, Nanney had built houses. Several of his Queen Anne-style homes in Rutherford County are on the National Historic Register. Miles recounts his work at Chimney Rock.
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Record #:
22270
Abstract:
O'Sullivan describes the art jewelry creations of Deb Karash, who has been a professional jeweler for almost twenty years. An opportunity to teach at the Penland School of Crafts brought her to Western NC in 2007. She settled in Bakersville and creates in the Marshall High Studios.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 5, July 2012, p24-25, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22274
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Abstract:
For years many collections of Western NC's historical records have been stored in the State Archives in Raleigh. However, as of August 10, 2014, Western NC will have its own official archive dedicated to the region. Its collections will be housed in a former Veterans' Administration nurses' dormitory in Asheville.
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Record #:
22280
Abstract:
David Earl Tomlinson is a self-taught metalworker. He was in the Marines five years and served in Saudi Arabia during the war. Around Asheville he is known as a musician and a commercial sign maker for some of the city's most recognizable businesses such as Salsa's, Minx, Clingman Cafe, and Mayfel's. He recently came up with the idea of making metal quits from leftover scraps. He placed one with a River Arts District Studio Stroll and it sold the first day. Commissions followed, and Southern Living featured a quilt in 2008. He currently shares space with other metal artists in a hanger-size West Asheville warehouse,
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22277
Author(s):
Abstract:
The many individuals who gathered for the Siler Family Meeting in Franklin this year are descendants of the nine children of Weimar and Margaret Siler who were among the first European to settle in Macon County when it was still Cherokee territory. This is the 160th meeting of the group--the oldest reunion of its kind in the nation. The descendants are quick to point out that it's actually happened for 159 years. During the Civil War they met twice one year--one for Union members and one for Confederate members to insure that divided loyalties didn't cause a rift in the family.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Aug 2012, p56-61, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22281
Abstract:
Five individuals in Western NC are making their marks in the design world with bridal dresses, handsome bags, graphic art, and innovative furniture. They are Whitney Deal [Whitney Deal Designs]; Drew Findley [Subject Matter Studio]; Eugene DuClos [Emerging Industrial Designer]; Karie Reinertson [Shelter Protects You]; Seyl Park [Cheme Designs].
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p48-59, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22278
Abstract:
Matt Jones came to his pottery work through a class at Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. He apprenticed with pottery masters in Connecticut and in Pittsboro, NC. Then he purchased a 19th century farmhouse near Leicester, NC for his family and settled into his life as a potter. Geer recounts where Jones gets his clay, firing the kiln, and his creations.
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WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Aug 2012, p62-69, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22276
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Abstract:
Henry River Mill Village was an abandoned and weathering collection of twenty-some buildings until Hollywood came calling to use it for scenes in the blockbuster movie, The Hunger Games. Now there is a growing interest in preserving what is left of the village. Elliston recounts some of the village's history.
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Record #:
22275
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Abstract:
In 2010, Rutherfordton is celebrating its 225th anniversary. It is a place of history. Christopher Bechtler minted the country's first $1 gold coin in 1831, and the town boasts the largest collection of antebellum architecture in their part of the state. Larkin describes some things to see and do in the town.
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Record #:
22279
Abstract:
Lenoir has a population of fewer than 18,500, yet its seventy-seven piece public outdoor sculpture collection is the largest per capita in the country. World-famous sculpture Thomas Sayre will soon add No. 78. At 26 feet in height and weighing 40,000 pounds, it will become the largest collection piece.
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Record #:
22282
Abstract:
Root & Vine, located in an historic 1901 building in Morganton, was launched by first-time restaurateurs Brian Miller and Aimee Perez. Their goal is "to present locally sourced ingredients in creative ways." Richards relates how this young eatery is progressing.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 7, Sept 2012, p61-63, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22283
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Abstract:
Leggett examines the many dimensions of Asheville abstract artist Kenn Kotara.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Oct 2012, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22290
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Abstract:
In 1890 a geyser was built on the grounds of the Round Knob Hotel, a favorite railroad stop in Old Fort, and it ceased functioning in 1903. Enter George Baker, a New York banker and board member of many railroad companies. He commissioned a new one to be built to honor his friend, Colonel Alexander Andrews, a noted Confederate soldier who oversaw the building of the Western North Carolina Railroad, and the 120 men who died building it through the NC mountains. In 2012, Andrews Geyser marked its 100 years of operation.
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Record #:
22285
Abstract:
The idea for a road connecting Tellico Plains, Tennessee to Robbinsville, North Carolina originated in 1958; however, it would take another thirty-eight years and $100 million to complete the forty-two-mile Cherohala Skyway. It was completed October 2, 1996 and was the most expensive road project ever undertaken in the state. The road is a marvel of engineering and was constructed over an area once considered impassable.
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