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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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38 results for "Upland Gazette"
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Record #:
20861
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At one time Bachman's sparrow ranged as far north as Pennsylvania and as far west as Illinois. Now it has disappeared from the Midwest and its northern range ends in North Carolina. It is listed as Special Concern in the state and may make the federal endangered species list if the decline continues. Marcus discusses reasons for the decline. It is the one bird in the state that is most dependent on prescribed burning on public and private lands.
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20864
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Prescribed burning, or the controlled burning of woodlands, helps restore the ecosystem by reducing the chances of wildfires, improving food growth for animals and birds, and controlling parasites. Despite the benefits to wildlife, the question arises whether it is desirable or disastrous to burn during the wild turkey nesting season. The authors report on a study of nesting-season controlled burns conducted on 100,000 acres at Fort Bragg. Information is provided on how the impact of the fire was determined, the results, and fire recommendations for turkey management.
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20863
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Nightly sounds of the Eastern Whip-poor-will have not been as common as they once were, and the reason for the decline is not clear. The bird is poorly documented by traditional long-term monitoring methods. Biologists lack basic information about the current distribution, relative abundance, and population trends. Kelly discusses ways the state is now collecting data and how land management can assist in maintaining the bird.
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Record #:
20862
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The NC Wildlife Resources Commission conducted a survey in 2012 to obtain demographic data and opinions on management and hunting seasons from dove and woodcock hunters. Six thousand dove hunters were surveyed with results from 3,500. Twenty-nine hundred woodcock hunters were surveyed with results from 1,400.
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Record #:
21181
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In June 2013, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission presented staff members of the Land Trust for Central North Carolina with the 2013 Excellence in Wildlife Management, Lawrence G. Diedrick Small Game Award. The award recognizes organization and individuals for the promotion of habitat management for small game species.
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21182
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Invasives are introduced, non-indigenous, or non-native species of plants and animals that get into local environments. Douglass explores how they arrive in the state, what effects they have on the state's ecosystem, names of some of the state's invasives, and what can be done about them.
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Record #:
18569
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In 1948 the state's wild turkey population was around 10,000. By 1970 it had bottomed out at about 2,000. Restoration efforts brought turkeys back to their current population of 260,000 all across the state. However, there is cause for concern over an occurrence known as the Southeast Wild Turkey Decline. For some reason turkey productivity is going down in a number of Southern states. In Arkansas the population has dropped by 100,000 since the early 2000s. North Carolina for the moment has not experienced decline but as Stanford reports it's a time bomb waiting to happen.
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Record #:
18571
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Eight North Carolina conservation organizations, which represent over 100,000 citizens, have joined together to promote common goals for wildlife habitats across the state. This article describes the work of the group and the impact of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm Bill on wildlife habitats on private lands.
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Record #:
18567
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The decline of quail throughout their range is widespread, and it's a big problem that does not come with easy answers. The required habitat changes are expensive and difficult to achieve because changes would impact large acreages of mostly privately owned lands. Without enough habitat to reverse the trend, hunters have proposed other solutions to the decline.
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Record #:
18570
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John Peeler, a land management consultant specializing in wildlife habitat projects, owns a farm in Davie County. Riley describes the results that occurred on Peeler's farm when he implemented some of the practices in the CURE (Cooperative Upland habitat Restoration and Enhancement) program.
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18568
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Research conducted at the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission's Southeastern Focal Area (SEFA) shows that quail populations can be improved with proper wildlife management given enough land, time, and financial commitment from landowners.
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Record #:
18590
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NCWRC District Wildlife Biologists are involved in many wildlife issues on private property, including tracking game population trends and advising landowners with habitat recommendations. At the same time the biologists rely on information supplied by sportsmen, hunters, and landowners,such as collecting biological data on deer, making disease observations, and observing wildlife.
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Record #:
18587
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The bobwhite quail is in trouble in North Carolina and across its entire range as its populations decline. McKenzie reports on the biggest bobwhite restoration effort in history which seeks to restore these ranges in twenty-two states to huntable levels.
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Record #:
18589
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Occasionally a hunter will spot a deer referred to as piebald or calico. Howard explains how this condition which is the result of a genetic abnormality affects the appearance of the deer. It does not affect the health of the deer population in an area and should not be considered an indicator that something is wrong with the herd.
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Record #:
18588
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Farrell reports on the success Toby Cole of the Harris community in Rutherford County has had over the past six years after he implemented a number of wildlife habitat improvement practices on his 288-acre property.
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