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Record #:
13535
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Abstract:
Sandhill's growing reputation as a winter horse training center is reinforced by the $25 million worth of horses there.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 44, Apr 1954, p4-5, 12, f
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Record #:
13527
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One slender street holds the twin cities of Sanford and Jonesboro in Lee County.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 41, Mar 1954, p9, f
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Record #:
11311
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North Carolina possesses one of the last remaining wilderness areas along the Atlantic Coast. It's called Smith Island, more popularly known as Bald Head. Locals are debating its future. Conservationists hope to create a maritime preserve, while Frank Sherrill envisions a huge resort and residential community. Sherrill, the owner of the island, plans to build the resort and create a town on the island complete with the proper infrastructure. This sub-tropical island attracts fisherman and nature watchers yearly since it remained uninhabited prior to the 1960s.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 19, Mar 1966, p8-9, il, map
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Record #:
13377
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Tom Ellis of Cedar Grove, Orange County, is the book-keeping wizard of small-town America. Ellis invented an economical book-keeping system for small businesses: \"$1 a week system,\" all contained in a book that sells for $6.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 21 Issue 15, Sept 1953, p1-2, f
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Record #:
15870
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Iden describes Airlie Gardens in Wilmington which are regarded by many as the most beautiful area to be found anywhere in North Carolina. The gardens are home to the 150-year-old Airlie live oak and other Southern flora.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 40, Feb 1936, p3, 21-22, il
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Record #:
11935
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Found off the coast of North Carolina, the feared barracuda generally haunt the wreckage of ships. Many of the wrecks are old blockade runners sunk during the War Between the States, others more recent wrecks, such as the petroleum tanker Esso Nashville, sunk by a German U-boat during World War II. Sports fishermen enjoy the aggressive, energetic movements of the barracuda as they skip bait across the water, catching specimens at times weighing more than forty pounds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 3, July 1958, p8-9, 16, por
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Record #:
15730
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Each Easter morning hundreds of Easter egg \"fighters\" gather near an abandoned school near Cherryville in Gaston County for the annual Sugar Hill Easter Egg Fight. It has been going on for at least seventy years, but no one knows how it started. Many think it was brought by early German immigrants to the Gaston area. In 1954, over 1,500 people showed up. The object of the game is this--contestants hold boiled, dyed eggs in their hands, with just the small end exposed; eggs are brought sharply together; the cracked egg goes to the winner.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 23, Apr 1955, p10-11, il
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Record #:
12595
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The second segment of a two-piece article written in an attempt to salvage the history regarding the careers of William A. Graham, Willie Person Mangum, George E. Badger, and Thomas L. Clingman, this article focuses on Thomas Clingman. An Asheville Whig turned Democrat, Thomas Clingman served seven terms in the House and two in the Senate. The last Senator to resign after secession, Clingman offered additional support in the fields of science and mountain exploration. (The first part of this article can be found in the previous issue, 15 July 1966, Vol. 34, No. 4.)
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 5, Aug 1966, p9-10, 20, por
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Record #:
12593
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William A. Graham, Willie Person Mangum, George E. Badger, and Thomas L. Clingman, men of high influence and public attainment, are often overlooked for their contributions to the history of North Carolina. Involved in statewide legislature and serving as either governor, constitutional lawyer, presidential candidate, or aspirant for the position as Justice of the United States Supreme Court, each of these four men are deserving of recognition for their public service to the peoples of North Carolina. (This is a two part article. The following segment can be found in the next issue, 1 August 1966, Vol. 34, No. 5.)
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 4, July 1966, p9-10, 12, por
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Record #:
12870
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The Battle of Bentonville, which was the bloodiest battle in North Carolina was also the last. The Confederates, led by Joseph Johnston, fought the Union army, led by General Sherman, to a draw. The Union's victory during the Carolina Campaign will be preserved as the land encompassing the site has been purchased for safeguarding. Totaling $50,000 dollars, the funds were obtained from the State Legislature as well as the Bentonville Battlefield Association.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 17, Jan 1960, p10, 14, il
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Record #:
14596
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Fontana Village covered 1200 acres and in 1946 was the largest hotel in the country. The property, located near Lake Fontana, was leased from the TVA. Despite the vast acreage, the hotel accommodated a mere 1200 patrons. Guests enjoyed scenery around the lake, the Fontana Dam, and natural sites around Great Smoky Mountain National Park.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 17, Sept 1946, p6-9, il
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Record #:
13207
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North Carolina native, Billy Joe Patton, of Morgantown, is famous for promoting golf in America. Winning third place in the 1954 Master's Tournament, held in Atlanta, Georgia, Patton earned recognition as one of America's finest amateur golfers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 10, Oct 1954, p13, por
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Record #:
15462
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There are two sports in which thousands of North Carolinians participate each fall - possum and raccoon hunting. Using packs of hunting dogs and various accoutrements, hunters try to outsmart raccoons with night hunting and climb perches to release possum from their trees.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 43, Mar 1937, p9, 16, f
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Record #:
1389
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Over the years, cities and towns across the state have adopted slogans and nicknames to identify their communities and foster economic development.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 9, Feb 1994, p25-26, il
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Record #:
12879
Abstract:
Fearing that the developing Virginia railroad companies might purloin trade and commerce in North Carolina, delegates, especially John Motley Morehead, became instrumental in forwarding the progress of the North Carolina Railroad Company during the 19th-century.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 27 Issue 20, Feb 1960, p8-10, il, por, map
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