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12 results for Wildflowers
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Record #:
30848
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The North Carolina Botanical Garden chose Piedmont Barbara’s Buttons (Marshallia obovata var. obovata) as Wildflower of the Year for 2009. Other award-winning melons, squash, and perennials are also described in this article, as well as tips on native plant gardening.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 3, Mar 2009, p10-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7135
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North Carolina has one of the largest highway systems in the nation, with 79,000 miles of state-maintained roads. Only Texas with 80,000 has more. Each year along these roadways, from the mountains to the coast, the North Carolina Department of Transportation cultivates some 3,500 acres in wildflowers. Now in its 20 year, NCDOT the wildflower program is the largest in the nation.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p98-100, 102, 104-105, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6753
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“The summer flowering episode is my favorite, particularly in the mountain region,” says Adams. ”Beginning around mid-July and lasting into September, the roadsides become an exciting hodgepodge of vivid yellows, purples, and reds.” The flowers that Adams describes are summer wildflowers. Spring wildflowers have plenty of sunshine to grow in, but the summer ones must compete for the light. This makes them grow tall, big, and in thick clusters. Such growth makes for good viewing of their blossoms either on road shoulders or in adjoining fields. He describes wildflower viewing in the following areas: Blue Ridge Parkway, Great Smoky Mountain National Park, Ashe and Alleghany Counties, U.S. Highway 19, and Nantahala and Pisgah national forests.
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Record #:
4608
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The North Carolina Botanical Garden named the eastern aromatic aster North Carolina Wildflower of the Year for 2000. This uncommon plant grows in only two western counties and blooms in early October. The wildflower program is in its 19th year.
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Record #:
16440
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This article discusses using native warm-season grass meadows cover and food for small game, mammals, and songbirds. Wildflowers, while creating a pleasant view, also attract butterflies and hummingbirds. The article includes a chart of grasses and wildflowers, the time to plant and the amount per acre.
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Record #:
2792
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Lovers of wildflowers can have their appreciation enhanced through use of a hand-held magnifying glass, which can reveal secrets unseen by the naked eye.
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Record #:
2014
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North Carolina's swamps, meadows, and woodlands are home to a large number of native plants, such as bee-balm and devil's walking stick, that stand out because of their colors, shapes, and leaf structures.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 11, Apr 1994, p16-17, il
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Record #:
26586
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The National Wildflower Research Center studies ways wildflowers can be used for water conservation, erosion control and landscaping. The Center stresses highway beautification, encouraging state highway departments to plant wildflowers along roadways.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 4, July/Aug 1989, p14, il
Record #:
9783
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The mountains ranges of the Southern Appalachians, Great Smokies, and Blue Ridge contain one of the richest floral gardens on the planet. Over 1,400 species of wildflowers have been recorded there. Ellis photographs and describes some of them.
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Record #:
26940
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A woodlands tract, known as Camassia Slopes, harbors rare and endangered species of wildflowers along the Roanoke River in Northampton County. The North Carolina Nature Conservancy will manage the site as a wildlife sanctuary and field laboratory for education and research projects. They will also begin an inventory of the plant species and monitor wildflower populations.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Aug 1982, p16, por
Record #:
9333
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Jake Beattie has made nearly 2,000 colored slides of four to five hundred species of flowers native to North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 2, July 1974, p25, 32, il, por
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Record #:
15526
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The shortia, so far as known, grows nowhere else in the world except in certain area of the state's mountains. The flower was found by Andre Michaux, the famous French botanist, on a trip through the state's mountains in 1787. It remained unnamed until Dr. Asa Gray, the American botanist, discovered it on a trip to Paris in 1838 and named it in honor of Professor Short of Kentucky. It was rediscovered in the mountains in 1877.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 2 Issue 39, Feb 1935, p21, il
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