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13 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Association
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Record #:
7073
Abstract:
The Tar Heel Junior History Association is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary in 2003. During its history the association has played a leading role in promoting the study of state and local history in the schools. The authors discuss some of the association's landmarks over the past fifty years, including the General Assembly's passing legislation ( Bill #207) establishing the association in April 1953, the start of the TAR HEEL JUNIOR HISTORIAN magazine in 1963, and the opening of a gallery in 1995 in the North Carolina Museum of History to showcase award-winning student projects.
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Record #:
7076
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Abstract:
Whatever state they are located in, junior historian organizations all share a common purpose, and that is to stress the idea that events that happen at home are just as important and history-making as those that happen elsewhere. The first junior historical society was organized in Indiana in 1938 and soon spread to other states, including Texas and New York. In North Carolina the idea was first discussed in 1946. Lewis discusses the work of historians, educators, and legislators that culminated in the passage of an act establishing the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association in 1953.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p12-15, il, por
Record #:
24932
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Abstract:
Since 1953, the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association has brought students from across North Carolina together to learn more about North Carolina history in their area. More than 5,000 students participate in the program across 53 counties, making the North Carolina program the largest in the nation. Students learn about their community’s place in history, conduct research, and present what they discovered.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p30, 32-33, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
31469
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The Tar Heel Junior Historian Association is a twenty-seven-year-old program operated under the North Carolina Museum of History, offering young historians a sense of pride in their local history and the preservation of oral and community history. Almost five-thousand students across the state are active in local history projects benefiting preservation in their communities and themselves.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Feb 1982, p14-15, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36356
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A breakdown of the awards given at the Twenty-fifth Anniversary Awards Day program of the Tar Hill Junior Historian Association and this year’s recipients. Mrs. Anne Kennedy of Raleigh, NC, was named Advisor of the Year.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 18 Issue No. 1, , p10-13, il
Record #:
36358
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Photographs show some of the projects, models and constructions that were awarded during the Twenty-fifth Anniversary Awards Day program of the Tar Hill Junior Historian Association.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 18 Issue No. 1, , p14-15, il
Record #:
36379
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Other awards given during the Twenty-fifth Anniversary Awards Day program of the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association included Group Literary Honorable mention to The History Seekers, Albemarle Junior High School, Albemarle, NC; The Youth Preservation Award presented to Malcolm Blue Junior Historians, Aberdeen, NC; The Youth Genealogy Award presented to Joy Harrison, Currituck Junior Historians, Barco, NC; and The Christopher Crittenden State History Quiz First Place Award presented to Jenny Coleman, Springfield History Club, Springfield Middle School, Lucama, NC.
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Record #:
36381
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A twentieth-century photograph image of a lone hunter standing on a mountain outcropping appeared in a previous issue and readers were asked to make up a story about the man in the picture. First Prize went to Heather Montgomery, of Westover Junior High School, Fayetteville, NC for ‘The Story of Zeb Windsworth.” Second Prize was awarded to Jackie Dukes, Ahoskie Middle School, Ahoskie, NC for her story ‘Jabber Henderson.’
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 18 Issue No. 1, , p39-40, il
Record #:
36382
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This inaugural issue reflects a youthful search for understanding and the many fascinating things you can discover about your locality and history. The magazine gives two stories, one ‘A Fairy Tale: For Social Studies Students and Others’ and ‘Your Roots’, which give a series of old letters from 1888.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 18 Issue No. 2, , p2-6, il
Record #:
36400
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The Martin ‘76ers’, a very active and award winning Tar Heel Junior Historian club at LeRoy Martin Junior High School, Raleigh, NC held a reunion of past and present members. They met at the North Carolina Museum of History in Raleigh, NC with about 150 participants.
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Record #:
36411
Author(s):
Abstract:
A twentieth-century photograph image of a lone hunter standing on a mountain outcropping appeared in a previous issue and readers were asked to make up a story about the man in the picture. First Prize went to Heather Montgomery, of Westover Junior High School, Fayetteville, NC for ‘The Story of Zeb Windsworth.” Second Prize was awarded to Jackie Dukes, Ahoskie Middle School, Ahoskie, NC for her story ‘Jabber Henderson.’
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 18 Issue No. 1, , p39-40, il
Record #:
36422
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Abstract:
Dr. John D. Neville presented the keynote address at Awards Day of the Tar Heel Junior Historians held at Peace College.
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Record #:
36426
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A list of all the 1985 Tar Hill Junior Historian Award winners from across the State in individual categories.
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