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4 results for Steamboats--North Carolina, Western--History
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Record #:
2907
Author(s):
Abstract:
Because of the difficulties of land travel, the steamboat Mountain Lily was a hoped for alternative route on the French Broad River in the early 1880s between Brevard and Asheville. The project failed after four years.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 64 Issue 1, June 1996, p12-13, il
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Record #:
14689
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before major infrastructure opened the western mountains for easy access, an enterprising man named Colonel S. V. Pickens tried to take advantage of river travel. In 1878, Pickens secured a charter for the French Broad Steamboat Company and $25,000 in state appropriations to open the French Broad River for river travel. With the charter and state money the Mountain Lily, a river steamboat, was launched in 1881 to run from Hendersonville to Brevard before finally making the trip to Asheville. Though the steamboat could carry passengers and cargo, the river proved inhospitable for river travel and after a few years was abandoned.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 47, Apr 1947, p7, il
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Record #:
14899
Author(s):
Abstract:
On the French Broad River, steamboat Mountain Lily carried passengers for a very brief time. During the summer of 1881, the steamboat attempted to run between Hendersonville, Brevard, and Asheville, but stranded after tumultuous weather blocked the river channel with sand and mud. Navigation throughout the French Broad River Valley was the brainchild of Colonel S. V. Pickens, who chartered the French Broad Steamboat Company and constructed Mountain Lily. After foundering at Johnson's Bridge, a Baptist congregation used the vessels as a meeting place until it was dismantled sometime later.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 19, Oct 1943, p4, il
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Record #:
31680
Author(s):
Abstract:
Once advertised as the “highest steam line in the world” the Mountain Lily was constructed to carry 100 passengers and cargo down part of the French Broad River between Brevard and Ashville. For Four years the steamboat carried passengers and cargo between Hendersonville and Brevard; and was host to several parties before it ran aground for the last time. There is no evidence that it ever made it to Ashville.
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