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7 results for Shipwrecks--North Carolina
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Record #:
19089
Abstract:
The remains of thousands of vessels lie off the coast of North Carolina, giving the state the nickname: \"Graveyard of the Atlantic.\" The wrecks themselves provide historical attractions for divers, but also attract a variety of marine flora and fauna.
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Record #:
19236
Abstract:
Recreational wreck diving is a growing industry in North Carolina and coastal North Carolina is strewn the remains of thousands of wrecks ranging from schooners to blockade runners and schooners.
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Record #:
28548
Author(s):
Abstract:
The reemergence of the 1864 Agnes E. Fry shipwreck and its importance are detailed. The Agnes E. Fry was a blockade runner intended to be used to evade Union warships during the Civil War. The Fry’s history, the account of its final run as told by Bernard Roux Harding, and its place off the NC coast are described. Billy Ray Morris, director of the Underwater Archaeology Branch, rediscovered the ship and he describes the work being done to preserve and document the find.
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Record #:
29923
Author(s):
Abstract:
Along the North Carolina and Virginia coasts, hundreds of shipwrecks lie on the beaches and underwater. Although some will never be uncovered, others are popular tourist and dive destinations like the DIAMOND SHOALS LIGHTSHIP and the USS MONITOR.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
30228
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two famous Outer Banks maritime disasters are being commemorated with markers by the North Carolina Department of Archives and History. A historical marker at Rodanthe will point out the spot where British tanker MILO was torpedoed and sunk in 1918. Additionally, a marker at Nags Head points out the naval catastrophe of the USS HURON, where 103 lives were lost in 1877.
Record #:
30560
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a new chapter for North Carolina's shipwrecks, skin divers are bringing up some of the secrets of the ocean depths. The latest target has been the Confederate blockade runner FANNY AND JENNY, which lies in shallow waters off Wrightsville Beach. One of several Confederate blockade runners to be lost along the North Carolina coast, the FANNY AND JENNY met her fate bound from Bermuda to Cape Fear, and is believed to have a cargo of valuable goods such as a solid gold, gem encrusted sword intended as a gift to General Robert E. Lee from British sympathizers.
Record #:
31403
Author(s):
Abstract:
The ironclad warship U.S.S. Monitor sank off the North Carolina coast in 1862 while being towed to Beaufort for an attack on Wilmington. In 1973, researchers located the Monitor shipwreck southeast of Cape Hatteras. Follow-up expeditions resulted in the designation of the Monitor shipwreck as the nation’s first national marine sanctuary.
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