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4 results for Russell, Daniel Lindsay, 1845-1908
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Record #:
20871
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article looks at the successful suit in the United States Supreme Court against the State of North Carolina by the State of South Dakota over the matter of state-issued bonds. In particular, the author tracks the fault for the bond issues to Governor Daniel L. Russell and his administration.
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Record #:
28628
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina Governor Daniel L. Russell was a nonconformist who offered radical alternatives to the economic and political dicta of the Democrats during the 1880s. Russell challenged southern sanctities concerning race, class and political party.
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Record #:
33668
Author(s):
Abstract:
After newly elected Governor Russel removes the head of the Railroad Commission from office, he sends the Keeper of Public Buildings and Grounds, “Uncle Dan” Terry to secure the offices of the Commission. When Dan finds that the commissioner is still there and refuses to leave, the Governor hands him a pistol and orders Dan to shot him out. Dan refuses even when Russel offers to pardon him.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 30, Dec 1938, p8
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Record #:
34594
Author(s):
Abstract:
Daniel Lindsay Russell Jr. was a captain of artillery for Confederate forces and later governor of North Carolina. Born in 1845 south of Wilmington, Russell joined the Confederate army and rose to the rank of Captain. During the war, however, Russell began to despise the Confederate government and openly discussed his views. After attacking another Captain over conscription, Russell was court martialed and eventually resigned. Following the war, Russell worked as a Supreme Court Justice and was elected governor in 1896. While he fought for racial equality, his personality and paternalistic attitude alienated voters, both black and white.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 12 Issue 1-4, 1996, p28-31