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17 results for Public schools--Finance
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Record #:
3424
Author(s):
Abstract:
Components of the General Assembly's 1997 Excellent Schools Act include raising standards for students, higher standards for teachers entering the profession, and funding for exemplary performance by schools and teachers.
Source:
Record #:
17678
Abstract:
During the last several months, school building needs have been the main topics of discussion in various counties throughout North Carolina. Part of the reason is due to the fact that the $50,000,000 school bond issue approved by voters is to be allocated among the counties on the basis of need, and schools are determining their needs in order to make a case for substantial allocation.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 20 Issue 6, Mar 1954, p4-5
Record #:
17916
Abstract:
One of the biggest concerns that North Carolina counties face is the financing of school capital outlay. McMahon discusses the types of needs that different schools face and the ways funding can be provided.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 23 Issue 6, Mar 1957, p14-16
Record #:
17971
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1957 North Carolina General Assembly created the North Carolina Committee for the Study of Public School Finance to study the problems involved in financing public schools. Areas of particular interest were vocational education and tax rules.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 25 Issue 4, Dec 1958, p24-25
Record #:
18235
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Governor's Commission on Public School Finance presented their report to the General Assembly in 1979. The biggest issue facing the state's public school system concerned the disparity of wealth distribution and how poorer communities had less to contribute. The article reviews the entire report and problems of financing the public school system in 1980.
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Record #:
18323
Author(s):
Abstract:
Liner examines the history of public school finance in North Carolina that is based on the principals state function and minimum standards of education.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 42 Issue 4, Spring 1977, p13-19
Record #:
25745
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s political leaders and the N.C. Constitution say all children have a chance for equal education, no matter where they live. The legislature has adopted a plan to spend $735 million to upgrade North Carolina’s public schools. But a profile of Chapel Hill Senior High and Bertie High explains why the new Basic Education Plan won’t close the gap between rich schools and poor ones.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 5 Issue 6, March 26-April 8 1987, p1, 11-15, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27246
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the continuing battle to get more funding for schools, Durham Public Schools is facing harsh criticism from residents. While achievement and graduation rates are rising, residents say the school system should focus its bond revenue on student needs not buildings.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 32, August 2016, p7, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
28944
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since the 1930s, North Carolina has provided foundation funding to all state systems to operate the schools. Even so, today, local appropriations account for twenty-five cents of every school dollar in North Carolina. The financial equity issue remains low on the education agenda even though it represents the cornerstone of any uniform system of free public schools.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p30-37, il, por, f
Record #:
30247
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than any other southern state except Texas, North Carolina has spent over $120 million for new school houses in the past six years. This amounts to 3.29 percent of the national total for new schools.
Record #:
31017
Author(s):
Abstract:
In comparison to the previous fiscal years from 1956 to the present, total costs for general instructional services increased over $12 million. Salaries for teachers, principles, and supervisors totaled over $141 million for the year
Record #:
31033
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1961 North Carolina General Assembly appropriated $427 million for the public school year, $15.5 million for vocational education, and over $5 million for the purchase of text books, and $5 million for new school buses. A new classroom teacher salary scale ranges from $3,607.50 to $5,605.50, making a 22.4 percent increase in salaries.
Record #:
31081
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1944 to 1960, total expenditures for public schools have risen nearly $170 million. Funds were divided between local, state, and federal funds, the largest percentage from state funds for all counties in the state.
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Record #:
31137
Author(s):
Abstract:
An annual increase of $30 million in requests has been made by the North Carolina State Board of Education to the Advisory Budget Commission for the improvement of public education. Of this increase, $22 million was requested for the nine month school fund for distribution of the local unites, and the remaining $8 million requested for various special programs.
Record #:
31182
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite being a primary concern of North Carolina's Governor Sanford, public schools are getting a smaller share of the General Fund than received under previous administrations. This is due to the sharp decline in pupil attendance, and the millions usually spent on pupils will become available to help pay for teacher salary increases and other public school improvements. In turn, more funds are left over from sales tax to pay for expansions and improvements in other state operations.