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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Printing industry
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Record #:
12434
Abstract:
Over twenty years ago the Printing Industry of the Carolinas (PICA) established a trade show in Charlotte. Held every other year, it has become the largest such exhibition in the Southeast, and one of the largest in the nation.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 43 Issue 11, Nov 1985, p22, 24, 113, il
Record #:
12436
Abstract:
Qualified employees for high tech printing and graphic arts operations are hard to find. Two public universities, East Carolina and Appalachian State, and fourteen of the fifty-eight community colleges, offer courses tailored to careers in printing. This article describes the programs offered at East Carolina University, Chowan College, and Lenoir Community College.
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Record #:
20289
Author(s):
Abstract:
Powell provides an amended list of Douglas C. McMurtrie's 1938 bibliography of 18th century North Carolina imprints. The bibliography lists books printed in North Carolina in the 18th century, along with books which no longer survive, but are thought to be a product of North Carolina.
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Record #:
21854
Abstract:
This article discusses the economic, geographic, social, and political factors that influenced literacy, the availability of printed materials, and the creation of libraries in North Carolina during the 17th and 18th centuries.
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Record #:
23927
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three businesses in Durham preserve the art of letterpress printing: Artisan Printer, Horse & Buggy Press, and Shed Letterpress. Each tackles a different market, including cards and invitations, art prints, and books.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 2, July 2015, p102-106, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
34383
Author(s):
Abstract:
Earl Bailey has dedicated much of his life to the art of printmaking at the Martin County Enterprise and Weekly Herald in Williamston. When Bailey began his career in the 1960s, the newspaper used letterpresses to print type on newsprint. Though the newspaper is no longer printed in Williamston, Bailey still does a lot of press work on stationary, letterheads and business cards.
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