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4 results for Photography--History
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Record #:
9314
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although the science of photography was only twenty years old at the onset of the Civil War, the making of tintypes was prevalent. Less expensive than regular photography, tintypes were an easy way for men to send their portraits home and to carry the portraits of loved ones with them.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 11, Apr 1980, p17, 39, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
27522
Author(s):
Abstract:
This photo essay shows the changes that development and time have brought the Triangle area. Photos from the past are paired with photos of the same places as they are in 1989. The locations include: Wonderland Theatre (1920), Watts Hospital (1909), IBM Site (1965), Hargett Street (1940), Fayetteville Street (1959), Carolina Barber Shop (1954), and Crook’s Fish & Produce Market (1951).
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 10, May 4-10 1989, p13-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
34986
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Baker Barber Collection at the Henderson County Public Library holds over 75,00 photographs of everyday life in North Carolina, many of which are unlabeled. Twice a month, volunteers gather together to go through some of the photographs in order to identify any known people, places, or things in the photographs.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 8, January 2017, p94-98, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
38249
Author(s):
Abstract:
Credited as the first woman to produce aerial shots, Bayard Wootten also produced innovative work in her pictures of blacks, rural areas, and people from lower classes. Reproductions of over 130 of her photographs are contained in Jerry Cotten’s biography Light and Air. More proof that the memory of her contributions has receded, but not vanished, is on display at University of North Carolina’s Wilson Library, Pack Memorial Library, and Western Carolina University’s Penland School of Crafts collection.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 7, Dec 2011, p56-58, 60, 62 Periodical Website