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10 results for North Carolina. Dept. of Cultural Resources
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Record #:
352
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Sara Hodgkins is the secretary of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Feb 1983, p10-14, f
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Record #:
504
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cathey profiles the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources and its various programs.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 56 Issue 1, Summer 1990, p22-30, bibl, f
Record #:
5020
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lisbeth C. Evans of Winston-Salem was appointed secretary of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources by Governor Michael F. Easley. Evans has served in various capacities in business, arts, and educational organizations, including serving as chairman of Winston-Salem Arts Council and on the boards of the Penland School of Arts, Reynolda House, the North Carolina Hospital, and others.
Record #:
11205
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Grace J. Rohrer, Secretary of Cultural Resources, is discussed in this ongoing series of brief profiles of major newly elected and appointed state officials. Rohrer is the second Secretary to head the department and the first woman.
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Record #:
11209
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The North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources has a small budget, around $8 million, and is small in manpower, about 300 employees, making it one of the state government's smaller departments. On the other hand, no other department oversees such a wide range of endeavors, with jurisdiction over such diverse assets, such as an art museum, a World War II battleship, and a symphony orchestra.
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Record #:
28879
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The North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources plans interpretive programs that dramatize history. At Tyron Palace in New Bern, visitors are welcomed by costumed interpretive actors; and at Historic Bath, the outdoor drama, Blackbeard: Knight of the Black Flag, is performed every summer.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Nov 1986, p8-9, por
Record #:
28880
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1971, North Carolina became the first state in the nation to establish a cabinet-level department of cultural resources. The department allocates resources to historic preservation, libraries and literary programs, exhibits of history, and artistic expression and appreciation.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Nov 1986, p10-11, il, por
Record #:
31406
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A new history of North Carolina traces the state’s social, economic, cultural and geographical development through its people and historic places. The Way We Lived in North Carolina is a five-volume illustrated series and the product of a six-year project with the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. The volumes offer glimpses of the earliest residents of now-famous historic places and notable North Carolinians.
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Record #:
31607
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The North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources has established an Office of Folklife Programs to revive an interest in our rich cultural heritage. A statewide Folklife Festival is being organized for June 1978, and will feature folk music, dancing, storytelling, food and craftsmanship. A program is also being developed to introduce public school students to traditional folk music through performances and discussions.
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Record #:
32611
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Abstract:
Recent statistics from North Carolina’s State Historic Sites indicate that the history business is booming. In 1980, there was a ten-percent increase in the number of visitors to the twenty sites operated by the Historic Sites Section of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources. This recent trend may be due to the inexpensive costs of visiting state historic sites, better publicity, and improvements in facilities and interpretations of the sites themselves.
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