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16 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Naval operations
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Record #:
1203
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although outgunned and outmanned, North Carolina's formidable ironclad, the Albemarle, won four crucial engagements to help southern forces recapture Plymouth late in the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 4, Sept 1993, p15-18, il
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Record #:
5118
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Abstract:
For the past two decades, East Carolina University's Maritime History Program, founded by Dr. William Still, has researched Civil War shipwrecks in such far-flung places as coastal North Carolina, France, Bermuda, and Micronesia. The writer discusses dive sites and what has been learned from them.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2001, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8564
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Navy began on May 27, 1861, when several Albemarle Sound steamers were organized as gunboats and army transports to protect the North Carolina shoreline. The navy had existed for only two months when the ships were bought by the Confederacy and used to challenge Federal ships. The Beaufort, for example, engaged the Federal ship the Albatross on July 22, 1861, and although neither ship suffered any major damage, the message was sent to the Federal army that passage through the Outer Banks would not go uncontested. That same day, all the North Carolina navy boats were bought by the Confederate army. The Beaufort engaged in several more battles and finally burned in Richmond on April 4, 1865.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 4, Sept 1982, p22-23, 39, il
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Record #:
8620
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Abstract:
Stationed off the Outer Banks in 1861, the WARREN WINSLOW captured four enemy ships. The WINSLOW's history is detailed in this article.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Mar 1983, p8-10, il, por, f
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Record #:
9285
Abstract:
In 1862, Jacksonville was captured briefly by a Yankee raid led by Lieutenant William B. Cushing. The Confederate army, however, forced the Lieutenant's vessel, the U.S.S. ELLIS, aground where it remained until January. The Lieutenant and his men withdrew, freeing Jacksonville. \r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 47 Issue 7, Dec 1979, p22-23, il, por
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Record #:
9948
Author(s):
Abstract:
In March 1863, Confederate Reserve soldiers stationed at Fort Branch on the Roanoke River in Martin County encountered and fired on a group of Federal ships that were on their way to the Federal base in Plymouth. A Williamston man, George L. Whitley, was a 17 year old sharpshooter at Fort Branch and is said to have mortally wounded the Captain of the lead vessel, causing the flotilla's retreat to Hamilton. A group of Alabama men are currently facing charges involving salvaging without a permit for raising three Fort Branch cannons from the Roanoke River in 1972. Responsibility for the cannons has been turned over to the N.C. Department of Archives and History and the Fort Branch Battlefield Commission.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 16, Feb 1973, p25, il
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Record #:
10070
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Abstract:
North Carolina furnished the Union ranks with 3,156 men (not including Negro regiments) during the Civil War. Capt. John Gibbon was one of the most famous Union soldiers in a North Carolina regiment. He led troops at many major battles including Second Bull Run, Antietam, and Gettysburg.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 11, Apr 1974, p21, 30, por
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Record #:
12364
Abstract:
The two pictures on the cover of this issue depict New Bern at different stages throughout history. One image captures New Bern in 1958 while the other is during Civil War occupation, showing Federal war craft in the water.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 23, Apr 1958, pcover, il, f
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Record #:
12816
Abstract:
Deemed an official port of delivery by the General Assembly in 1790, Plymouth, North Carolina served as the location for three battles during the Civil War. Postwar expansion served the city well, welcoming railways, paper mills, plywood plants, and a liquid aluminum plant.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Oct 1960, p15-16, il, por
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Record #:
13572
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Abstract:
The second in a series of three articles about the Battle of Fort Fisher, Wellman offers details about what he refers to as, \"the Confederacy's greatest naval battle.\" He describes the bombardment of the fort and the first two attacks. Illustrations depicting the Federal fleet off Cape Fear are also included. The first article in this series can be found in the October 1952, Volume 20, Number 18 issue, pages 3-4, 19.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 20, Oct 1952, p12-13, 19, 24, il, map
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Record #:
13567
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first in a series of three articles about the Battle of Fort Fisher, Wellman offers details about he calls the \"the Confederacy's greatest naval battle.\" Setting the scene at the fort, Wellman offers details of the ships and soldiers that will engage in battle throughout December 1864, into January, 1865.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 18, Oct 1952, p3-4, 19, il, map
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Record #:
13576
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wellman offers details about what he refers to as, \"the Confederacy's greatest naval battle\" in the third of a series of three articles about the Battle of Fort Fisher. Discussing infantry operations and the Union victory over the Confederacy, he describes the final engagements. The first article in this series can be found in the October 1952, Volume 20, Number 18 issue, pages 3-4, 19. The second article is in the October 1952, Volume 20, Number 22 issue, pages 12-13, 19, 24.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 22, Nov 1952, p5-7, il
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Record #:
13960
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Abstract:
Though Cape Hatteras is well known for its many shipwrecks and other disasters, few are familiar with the Battle of Hatteras Inlet Batteries in 1861, one of the most important early naval engagements of the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 22, Oct 1950, p5, 20, il
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Record #:
20936
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This article looks at the life of the 460-ton steamer SOUTHERN STAR built and launched by Jesse Jackson at Murfreesboro in 1857. Details of the ship's service as a government steamer under the new name of CRUSADER, her time helmed by Lt. John Newland Maffitt, service to the Union under the command of Lt. T. Augustus Craven during the Civil War, and the end of her life in commercial service on the west coast is included.
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Record #:
21515
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Maffitt was a Confederate navy captain and a successful blockade runner. He served in the US Navy up to 1861 when he resigned to join the Confederacy. Winstead's article follows Maffitt's career, his actives in the Cape Fear River, and the contributions he made to two nations.
Source:
Recall (NoCar F 252 .R43), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Fall 2009, p17-21, por
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