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6 results for Mentally ill--Care of
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Record #:
475
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Abstract:
A new outpatient law, the first of its kind in the nation, is designed specifically to aid chronic mental patients who at the time of their commitments are not considered dangerous.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Spring 1987, p17-22
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Record #:
1899
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Threshold, an East Durham rehabilitation program for the seriously mentally ill, seeks to improve the quality of life of its members and to prevent unnecessary hospitalization.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 36, Sept 1994, p14-17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
12942
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North Carolina workers are changing the way they handle patients with mental disabilities. In addition to the four mental hospitals and the three training schools established for mentally defective children, the state has augmented the corresponding budget as well as abolished hospital waiting lists for afflicted patients.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 21, Mar 1958, p15-16, il
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Record #:
21770
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This article discusses 19th century North Carolina psychiatrist Dr. Patrick L. Murphy. His work as superintendent of the Western State Asylum for the Insane in Morganton is presented, with emphasis on this work for patient rights and well-being. Typical mental illness care in asylums during the late 19th century and the associated difficulties are also examined.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
24487
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Abstract:
Dorothea Lynde Dix (1802-1887) worked to help the mentally ill and helped create the first mental asylums in America. She went to North Carolina in 1848 to change attitudes concerning mental illness and found mental institutions there.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 9, February 1978, p25-27, il, por
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Record #:
3149
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Abstract:
In 1848, Dorothea Dix lobbied the General Assembly for a hospital for the mentally ill. Though rejected at first, Dix's relationship with the dying wife of legislator James C. Dobbin earned his strong support, and the bill passed.
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