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17 results for Liquor--Law and legislation
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Record #:
1171
Author(s):
Abstract:
The basic system governing the sale of alcoholic beverages in North Carolina is the local option system. Local option allows the voters of each county and town to decide what alcoholic beverages legally may be sold there. This system has been modified through the years, and today faces stiff challenges.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 58 Issue 4, Spring 1993, p36-42, il, f
Record #:
1810
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state legislature has passed a law adjusting the required split between liquor and food revenues for restaurants with liquor licenses from 50-50 to 60-40, meaning that now for every dollar taken in, as much as sixty cents can come from alcohol sales.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Aug 1994, p43, il
Record #:
11217
Abstract:
In the November 6 election North Carolinians will vote to decide whether or not counties will have the local option to serve mixed drinks. This article provides information on what a \"For\" or \"Against\" vote will mean in the individual counties.
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Record #:
11219
Author(s):
Abstract:
Since 1960, J. Marse Grant has served as editor of the BIBLICAL RECORDER, the official journal of the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina. He is a longtime leader in the fight against liquor by the drink in the state. He discusses why voters should defeat the issue.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 10, Oct 1973, p26, 50-51, por
Record #:
11218
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ryan is chairman of the statewide Citizens for Choice and Control which is coordinating the campaign for passage of the mixed drink sale issue on the November ballot. He discusses why voters should pass the issue.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 31 Issue 10, Oct 1973, p25, 49-50, por
Record #:
12233
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina controls the sale of liquor through the Alcohol Beverage Commission, (ABC). No other state does it this way. Mooneyham discusses whether the North Carolina General Assembly will act during its 2010 Session to reduce state control of liquor and move toward promoting free enterprise.
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Record #:
13575
Author(s):
Abstract:
At a time when the General Assembly is reconsidering the North Carolina liquor laws, Pleasants chronologically recounts the, \"never ending legislative controversy\" surrounding alcohol within the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 20 Issue 22, Nov 1952, p3-4
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Record #:
15261
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 1930s western portion of the state was still a dry region. Buncombe and other counties west of the Blue Ridge Mountains remained under Republican control and a big reason for continued prohibition. Women's Temperance Union banners were awarded to Yancey County for highest percentage of dry votes and Buncombe County for largest majority of dry votes in 1908.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 34, Jan 1939, p10-11, 22
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Record #:
16795
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the 1970s there were few quality restaurants in the Research Triangle Area; however, an event in the 1979 North Carolina General Assembly would soon change all that. It was the passage of an act to allow local jurisdictions to vote on whether they would allow the sale of mixed drinks. At the time most of the state counties were dry, but in wet counties restaurant diners were allow to \"brown bag,\" or bring their own liquor to the restaurant.
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Record #:
17478
Author(s):
Abstract:
Coates recounts the history of liquor laws from the colonial period to post-Prohibition laws. Selling liquor and spirits creates a tumultuous history with many different options attempted by lawmakers from unrestricted sales, total outlawing of alcohol, to the 1937 mandate of limiting liquor sales through state supervision.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 4 Issue 5, Feb 1937, p1-3, 16, por
Record #:
17497
Abstract:
The State A.B.C. Board oversaw all of the county based boards, which in 1937 only 27 counties voted in favor of selling liquor. State board responsibilities include approving brands of liquor for sale, testing quality of liquor sold, and regulating how much a single store can distribute. All stores selling spirits were responsible for abiding by state mandated laws and regulations drawn up by the State A.B.C. Board.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 4 Issue 9, Aug 1937, p11-12, il
Record #:
17493
Abstract:
Contemporary laws in 1937 confused law enforcement officers on legal issues concerning alcohol. Topics especially problematic included the transportation of alcohol, the borders between dry and non-dry areas, and what is regarded as alcohol.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 4 Issue 8, July 1937, p1-2, por
Record #:
18079
Author(s):
Abstract:
Loeb reviews the state laws relating to liquor in several states including North Carolina, and how those laws compare to actual consumption statistics.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 3, Nov 1971, p11-19
Record #:
18169
Author(s):
Abstract:
Regulation of alcohol by the state varied between malt beverages/unfortified wines and liquor but both systems garnered revenue. Taxation of malt beverages and unfortified wines applied only to private individuals purchasing and maintaining permits for production. Liquor could not be produced by private citizens but was state controlled with counties and cities opening and operating stores.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 35 Issue 3, Nov 1968, p11-20
Record #:
23880
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new state law beginning in October 2015 will allow distillers to sell their brews directly to customers rather than requiring them to purchase from ABC stores only. This law would help boost the sales of state-made liquors.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 27, July 2015, p12-13, por Periodical Website
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