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17 results for Taxation--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
17819
Abstract:
For a number of years, the question of the constitutionality of double taxation has been discussed among local North Carolina officials. Given the recent case WILSON V. HIGH POINT AND THE COUNTY OF GUILFORD, county and city officials are questioning the arrangement of double taxation as a violation of North Carolina Constitution and as a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 21 Issue 7, Apr 1955, p7-8, 11, Inside back cover
Record #:
17887
Abstract:
The article's title refers to a hypothetical situation to better explain how tax collectors gather taxes from bankrupt and/or closed businesses. To approach this question, the author explains legislative measures in place to protect debt collectors whether they take action within 30 or 60 days.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 32 Issue 6, Mar 1966, p14-16, 20-21, 23
Record #:
18169
Author(s):
Abstract:
Regulation of alcohol by the state varied between malt beverages/unfortified wines and liquor but both systems garnered revenue. Taxation of malt beverages and unfortified wines applied only to private individuals purchasing and maintaining permits for production. Liquor could not be produced by private citizens but was state controlled with counties and cities opening and operating stores.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 35 Issue 3, Nov 1968, p11-20
Record #:
18203
Author(s):
Abstract:
State revenue is generated from both the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages. The author presents statistics concerning profits from alcohol from 1946 to the time of this article. Mr. Lawrence also analyzes the distribution of ABC stores and wealth accrued between different counties throughout the state for the purposes of proposing further legislation to increase state revenue.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 35 Issue 5, Feb 1969, p20-27, il, map, f
Record #:
18539
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tax-increment financing is a program allowing cities to borrow fund for development projects and repay those loans through increased taxes. In Spring 1982, the General Assembly approved tax-increment financing programs and put to a public vote in the fall of 1982. The article reviews pros and cons of tax-increment financing and a voters' guide on the subject.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 48 Issue 1, Summer 1982, p29-33
Record #:
27386
Author(s):
Abstract:
As April 15th approaches, the tax laws of the federal and state government are explained. The history of taxation and legislation is also examined. Rates of taxation on goods and services and personal income tax are explored comparing individuals in the top one percent with those in the working class. The influence business lobbyists have on tax laws is also explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 15, April 10-16 1991, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
29772
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly passed several measures during this session. Bills dealt with changes to tax structure, transportation and general state business climate. Major bills are meant to stimulate business growth in the state, targeting tax credits for research and development.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p36-38
Record #:
30095
Author(s):
Abstract:
There is a bill now under consideration in Congress that will freeze the tax on employer and employee for old-age and survivors benefits at the present rate of 1 percent for 1945. The main reasoning behind the freeze of the Social Security Tax is worry that there is inadequate reserve in the trust funds for the present. If the bill does not pass, there will be an increase to 2 percent.
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Record #:
30156
Author(s):
Abstract:
The House has approved a new federal tax law which would increase taxes on items such as automobiles, cigarettes, and gasoline, and lowers taxes on telegrams. However, given that the percentage that each state pays in federal taxes, North Carolina would be paying more in taxes under the new bill.
Record #:
30219
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Executive Director of the Tax Foundation argues that taxes will be cut unless Congress takes steps to prevent these cuts. Areas that could prevent increase would be in alterations to excess profits tax, individual income tax, and selective excise taxes.
Source:
Record #:
30259
Author(s):
Abstract:
To produce the money for operating the state services, North Carolina business and industry have experienced more than two decades of stabilized revenue laws. The laws, which were written in 1933, have seen changes only of some of the schedules applicable to business enterprises. The latest revisions arrived a basis for taxing foreign corporations.
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Record #:
30262
Author(s):
Abstract:
New industry coming to North Carolina can look forward to low employment tax rates as a result of changes in the rate structure made by the 1953 General Assembly. The reduction in cost rage has been accomplished for the last three years and allowed the fund to increase.
Source:
Record #:
30261
Author(s):
Abstract:
For North Carolina, income tax is the largest source of revenue for the General Fund. The tax is graduated with a maximum of seven percent on incomes above $10,000, while the corporate tax is six percent on net income. There have been changes recently to this allocation formula, which now determines the franchise and income taxes paid by foreign corporations.
Record #:
31048
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the bills before Congress this spring is HR 7640. Introduced in 1961, the bills seeks to make permanent the temporary tax rate of 0.4 percent. The temporary increase was estimated to cost North Carolina $19 million with the majority of benefits going to northern industrial states. The bill would also seek to make permanent a 50 percent increase in the number of weeks for which benefits are paid, and increase the benefits to a maximum of two-thirds the average weekly wage.
Source:
Record #:
31049
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the eighth time in 12 years, the social security tax has increased. The latest tax rate increased enacted by the last Congress will amount to one-eighth of one percent on employees and a like amount for employers. The new law also schedules three additional rate increases to occur by 1968.