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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for "Traditions--North Carolina, Coastal"
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Record #:
27475
Author(s):
Abstract:
October in North Carolina feels incomplete without two classics: N.C. State's Howling Cow ice cream and ham biscuits from the First United Methodist Church Cary, which have been delicious fair staples for decades. Rooted in a spirit of community and agriculture education, these treats also tap into the fair's longer history and traditions.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 40, Oct 2016, p26, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
36319
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Kooner signifies the connection between Africa and the shore that African slaves landed on. The masked tradition remains a tribute to African-European-American Indian-Caribbean peoples.
Record #:
34487
Author(s):
Abstract:
Author Lila Morton reminisces on making incendiary fire balls with friends during her childhood.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Spring 1993, p7
Record #:
34498
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brinson fondly recalls a Christmas tradition started by his local First Methodist Church. Following Christmas service, children in the congregation would receive handmade bags filled with treats. Later in life, Brinson himself would fill the bags with several other family members, continuing the tradition.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Fall 1993, p6
Record #:
34493
Author(s):
Abstract:
Phillips documents folk practices marking passage of time for a family in the Outer Banks drawing on an oral account.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Summer 1993, p7
Record #:
34484
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the homecoming traditions in Carteret County is Battle for the Bucket—a football game between East and West Carteret High Schools dating to the 1950s. Inspired by the traditions behind the game, the author includes a poem expressing personal significance of the game.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Fall 1992, p12-13
Record #:
19111
Abstract:
North Carolina Sea Grant researchers are attempting to understand the lasting traditions in coastal areas like Harkers Island.
Source:
Record #:
35463
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author surmises where the tradition of Old Buck came from as a part of Old Christmas in the Outer Banks.