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12 results for "Historic buildings--Winston-Salem"
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Record #:
13719
Author(s):
Abstract:
Zerwick discusses three generations of women who have left their mark on Reynolda House.\r\n\r\n
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 10, Mar 2011, p98-100, 102, 104-106, 108, 110, 112, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7237
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reynolda House, built between 1906 and 1917 in Winston-Salem, was the home of tobacco baron Richard Reynolds and his wife Katherine. It opened to the public in 1967 as a museum, one of the first in the country to specialize in American art. The museum has opened a $12 million, three-story addition, the Mary and Charles Babcock Wing, named for the daughter and son-in-law of the Reynolds's. The 30,000-square-foot addition includes galleries, an expanded museum store, and an auditorium.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 6, June 2005, p10, il
Record #:
7305
Abstract:
Reynolda House, built between 1906 and 1917 in Winston-Salem, was the home of tobacco baron Richard Reynolds and his wife Katherine. It opened to the public in 1967 as a museum, one of the first in the country to specialize in American art. On April 1, 2005, the museum will open a $12 million, three-story addition, the Mary and Charles Babcock Wing, named for the daughter and son-in-law of the Reynolds's. The 30,000-square-foot addition includes a new visitor center, orientation gallery, video, acoustic guides, oral history stations, museum store, two-level auditorium, art library, a changing exhibition gallery, and education studios.
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Record #:
7323
Abstract:
The Single Sisters House at Salem College in Winston-Salem is the oldest building on a North Carolina college campus. The year on the date stone of the original house is 1786. A 19th-century addition enclosed it, although it is still visible in the attic of the addition. In the early days, the house served as quarters for students and teachers, who lived, studied, worshipped, and worked together. The house is being reclaimed and rededicated by Salem Academy and College as a national landmark of women's education.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p94-96, 98, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5852
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Abstract:
At the corner of East Sprague and Peachtree streets in Winston-Salem stands a bright yellow gas station in the shape of a clamshell. Built in the 1930s, this former Shell Oil Company service station has recently been restored by Preservation North Carolina for use as a satellite office. Kerr describes the preservation process.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 12, May 2003, p136-137, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3681
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reynolda House, the Winston-Salem home of tobacco baron Richard and Katherine Reynolds, houses an outstanding collection of American art. The 44,000-square-foot house, built between 1906 and 1917, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
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Record #:
3874
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Abstract:
Winston-Salem's Graylyn Estate, built as a private residence by Bowman Gray, Sr. in the 1920s, is one of the country's best examples of Norman Revival architecture. Now owned by Wake Forest University, the 98-room estate is a world-class conference center.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 6, Nov 1998, p102-104, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12359
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bowman Gray and his wife Nathalie built their home, Graylyn Estate, on land purchased from Reynolda Inc. in 1925. The estate was given to the Bowman Gray Medical School in 1946, then to Wake Forest University in 1972. Following reconstruction after a 1980 fire, the building became Wake Forest's conference center.
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Record #:
12293
Abstract:
The attic of the Reynolda House, once the Winston-Salem home of RJ Reynolds, has been transformed into a museum that showcases over 400 pieces of early 20th century clothing, many articles worn by the Reynolds family and some designed by Mrs. Reynolds. The collection is known as the Reynolda Costume Collection.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 1, June 1973, p12-13, il
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Record #:
11706
Author(s):
Abstract:
Originally constructed in 1772 and rebuilt in 1784, the Salem Tavern is an excellent example of a Southern ordinary inn. Designated as a National Historic Landmark, by the Department of the Interior, the Salem Tavern played an important role during the American Revolution and later in the Civil War. \r\n\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 32 Issue 14, Dec 1964, p10-12, il
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Record #:
12845
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Abstract:
Duke Power Company's new dam on the Catawba River will form the much anticipated Lake Norman. In an effort to save some of the heritage that will be lost, efforts were focused on moving one of the great houses of the antebellum period, the Elmwood house. Inhabited by the Graham family, members of the river gentry, the Elmwood House, now in the care of Mr. And Mrs. Charles Babcock, will be relocated to the Winston-Salem area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 28 Issue 21, Mar 1961, p11, 30, il
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Record #:
12361
Abstract:
Another building in old Salem has been acquired for restoration. The transaction will give Winston-Salem back its oldest tobacco shop while eliminating its oldest drug store.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 22, Mar 1958, p16
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