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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Women--Education
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Record #:
7323
Abstract:
The Single Sisters House at Salem College in Winston-Salem is the oldest building on a North Carolina college campus. The year on the date stone of the original house is 1786. A 19th-century addition enclosed it, although it is still visible in the attic of the addition. In the early days, the house served as quarters for students and teachers, who lived, studied, worshipped, and worked together. The house is being reclaimed and rededicated by Salem Academy and College as a national landmark of women's education.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p94-96, 98, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15164
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When St. Mary's opened in Raleigh 1842 thirteen girls attended. In 1942, 225 girls attended and ranged in maturation from kindergarten to college ages. Previously it was an Episcopal, all-boys school known as Ravenscroft Grove. Daily activities included: prescribed exercise, prayer time, Bible lessons, and tea breaks. Famous alumni included: Annie Lee, daughter of Robert E. Lee, Margaret Wilson McAdoo, Woodrow Wilson's daughter, and Francis Fisher AKA Christian Reid the famous southern writer.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 49, May 1942, p10, 22, il
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Record #:
16196
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WABPS stood for the Woman's Association for the Betterment of Public Schoolhouses was a reform organization operating in the early 20th-century. Students from the State Normal and Industrial School for Women, now the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, founded the organization to improve existing and provide new educational environments. It was an-all woman run organization and men could join but only after paying dues and with the understanding that they were not allowed to vote or make decisions within the organization.
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Record #:
20566
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Littleton Female College began in January 1882 under the name of Central Institute near the village of Littleton. It officially became Littleton Female College in 1888 and would remain an all-female institution though it changed its name to Littleton College in 1912. The author reviews the history of the college's organization, academic history, and those individuals crucial in forming and running the college.
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Record #:
21466
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A look at the efforts to improve collegiate education of white women at the turn of the 20th century as an example of the disparate impact of Southern progressivism upon education. In their desire to pattern the educational institutions of the New South, developed between 1890 and 1920, along the traditional racial, gender, and class divisions and roles of the Old South, Progressive reformers illustrated the paradoxical character of Southern social reform of this period.
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Record #:
25038
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There has been a decline of people going into science careers or even earning advanced science degrees. More effort is now being put into getting women and minorities interested in science.
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Record #:
27719
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Girls Rock NC is a winner of a 2014 Indie Art Award. The group runs a camp, after school programs, and retreats for adults. Their main initiative is a music camp for girls 7-16 to help them learn to raise their voices as young women through music. The Chapel Hill group hosts sessions on body confidence, the history of women in music, and leadership. Girls Rock NC helps girls gain confidence and works for social justice.
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Record #:
32210
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Many North Carolina women are attending the fifty or more community colleges and technical institutes across the state. Women may study to be secretaries, nurses, cosmetologists, or they may prepare for transfer to a four-year college or university. There are also alternate routes adults may take to get a high school education.
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Record #:
34489
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This article is a reprint of an essay, submitted in 1930, by Lillian Rice to her Senior English IV class. Rice discusses her thoughts on graduating high school and the value that is placed on having a diploma.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Spring 1993, p9-10