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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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39 results for "Community colleges"
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Record #:
24316
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Distance learning is becoming more popular at the collegiate level. Various community colleges offer distance learning and other video-taught classes.
Record #:
24828
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North Carolina businesses are now teaming with the state’s Community College System to train skilled workers in the fields they need. Catawba Valley Community College in Hickory, for example, teaches students upholstery, pattern-making, and assembly skills to train for the furniture industry in Catawba County. Other community colleges are tailoring their programs for their respective county’s industries.
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Record #:
29327
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In the wake of the 1991 North Carolina General Assembly session and the $1.25 billion revenue shortfall, the Department of Community Colleges is continuing to find more effective ways to deliver training and education. To aid community colleges with their goals in the face of growing enrollment, schools are seeking aid from the business community to provide backing in both funds and morale.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, September 1991, p28-30, il, por
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Record #:
29537
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Vance-Granville Community College is training the areas workforce with four campuses across the region. The college is also involved with economic development and offers direct assistance to small businesses in the area.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 7, Jul-Sup 2007, p28-29, por
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Record #:
29584
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The numbers show that Pitt Community College is an asset to eastern North Carolina. Seventy-eight percent of students who enrolled at Pitt stayed in the region and have contributed to the local economy, especially through health sciences.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 11, Nov-Sup 2007, p12, por
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Record #:
29590
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The Small Business Center, associated with Pitt Community College, provides client-oriented resources through individual counseling times, classes, and seminars for new business owners or established businesses in the region.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 11, Nov-Sup 2007, p23, por
Record #:
29746
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Abstract:
In small Western North Carolina towns, some lesser-known yet high-ranking community colleges are changing lives for local students of all ages and backgrounds. Mayland Community College provides hundreds of workforce development and continuing education courses that serve Mitchell, Avery and Yancey counties. Western Piedmont Community College in Morganton is one of the only community colleges in the state with a sustainable agriculture program.
Record #:
29758
Abstract:
As Guilford County's aviation cluster grows, Guilford Technical Community College is taking on the growth with T.H. Davis Aviation Center. The institution is training future workers to support the growing aviation sector and support developments at Piedmont Triad International Airport.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p50, 52, por
Record #:
29777
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Running a small business is difficult, but the North Carolina Small Business Center Networks provides every tool possible to make the task a little easier. Operating out of all the state's 58 community colleges, the network provides workshops and guidance to help the small business sector grow throughout North Carolina.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 1, Jan 2009, p24-25, por
Record #:
29780
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Abstract:
In both Edgecombe and Nash counties, community colleges are striving to provide services not only to students but the community as well. Programs, initiatives, and specialties make Edgecombe Community College and Nash Community College integral in their community development infrastructures.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 67 Issue 1, Jan 2009, p37-40, por
Record #:
30315
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Abstract:
Dr. Scott Ralls became the seventh president of the North Carolina Community College System in May. Ralls points out that some of the major issues facing the System are degree completion, faculty salaries, and workforce shortages in jobs. In this article, Ralls discusses how he will focus on five major areas to overcome these issues and challenges in the state’s community colleges.
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Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 87 Issue 3, Fall 2008, p11-12, il, por
Record #:
30919
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The NC Community College System prepares students for a variety of careers, while giving members of the workforce opportunities to enhance their skill sets.
Record #:
31094
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It is often assumed that the cost of college education can be reduced by two-year community colleges such as the system proposed for North Carolina. Costs to the students are lower than other institutions; however, total operating costs can be substantial to the taxpayer and can only be offset by large enrollment numbers.
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Record #:
32052
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North Carolina’s technical institute-community college system offers people opportunities to improve their incomes and helps place them in rewarding jobs. This article discusses various programs that are offered throughout the state and the types of jobs available for graduates.
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Record #:
32210
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Abstract:
Many North Carolina women are attending the fifty or more community colleges and technical institutes across the state. Women may study to be secretaries, nurses, cosmetologists, or they may prepare for transfer to a four-year college or university. There are also alternate routes adults may take to get a high school education.
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