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20 results for "African Americans--History"
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Record #:
2323
Abstract:
In 1880, the Outer Banks Pea Island Lifesaving Station was the nation's only station entirely manned by Blacks. Led by Richard Etheridge, the men earned a reputation for skill and courage during Reconstruction, a time of prejudice and racial tension.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1995, p2-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4137
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Outer Banks Pea Island Lifesaving Station was the nation's only station manned by African Americans. Operating from the late 19th-century until 1947, when machines made rowboats obsolete, the surfmen aided over 30 distressed ships and saved over 200 people. Their most famous rescue was saving the crew of the hurricane-ravaged schooner E.S. NEWMAN on October 11, 1896.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
30864
Author(s):
Abstract:
Until only a few years ago, few knew much about the first black Marines, or even that they trained in North Carolina. A museum is housed at today’s Camp Johnson in Jacksonville, where the first recruits attended boot camp in the 1940s. At the museum, visitors see what the men’s living quarters looked like, artifacts, and photographs.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 8, Aug 2009, p36, por
Full Text:
Record #:
3174
Author(s):
Abstract:
Afro-Americans during the antebellum period consisted of two groups: slaves, who were considered property; and free Blacks, whose rights, such as voting, were limited by the Constitution of 1835.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 36 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
30566
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article expands on the importance of using African American sources when engaged in African American historical studies.