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3 results for Etheridge, Richard, 1842-1900
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Record #:
2323
Abstract:
In 1880, the Outer Banks Pea Island Lifesaving Station was the nation's only station entirely manned by Blacks. Led by Richard Etheridge, the men earned a reputation for skill and courage during Reconstruction, a time of prejudice and racial tension.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , May/June 1995, p2-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
4163
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several members of the Pea Island Life-saving station, including the station keeper, were dismissed for negligence in 1879. When Richard Etheridge, an Afro-American, was placed in command, the remainder of the white crew quit, and Etheridge was free to choose a crew possessing the best qualities of a lifesaver. The crew was all Afro-American. Their service in saving lives earned them a reputation for skill and courage.
Source:
Record #:
38910
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pea Island Life Saving Station in Dare Co., NC was the first life-saving station in the United States to have an all African-American crew. In 1880, Capt. Richard Etheridge, an African-American, was appointed the second keeper of the Pea Island Life Saving Station and he successfully ran it with military precision. The original site was purchased in 1878 and the new station was destroyed by a mysterious fire in 1880. A new station was built and used until a new site was acquired in 1908 and the old station abandoned. In 1930, a new ten acre site was acquired from the Pea Island Club and the old station abandoned. In 1947, Pea Island Life Saving Station was disestablished and in 1949 the station was turned over to the Fish and Wildlife Service, for use in connection with the Pea Island Migratory Waterfowl Refuge.