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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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20 results for "African Americans--History"
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Record #:
28244
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Prominent historian Dr. John Hope Franklin of Duke speaks out on the real work of ending discrimination. Franklin believes that apologizing for slavery and injustices done to African-Americans is not enough. Franklin also discusses the politics of slavery and the post-Reconstruction era. Topics covered in the interview include the Wilmington race riots, race relations, the taking down of statues of racist individuals, and his family's history.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 16, April 2007, p7 Periodical Website
Record #:
30566
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article expands on the importance of using African American sources when engaged in African American historical studies.
Record #:
30655
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New African-American heritage trails are making history come alive by linking North Carolina places to historic contributions and pivotal events. Many of the trails pertain to African-American culture, art and music, or the underground railroad. This article provides descriptions of trails offered in Jacksonville, Halifax, New Bern, Wilmington, Winston-Salem, and Raleigh.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 4, Apr 2014, p44-45, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
30753
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In 1981, small business owner and civil rights activist Eddie McCoy began an African American oral history project in Granville Co, NC. While not a trained historian, McCoy’s interviews stand apart from other oral history projects with respect to the insight and perspective he could elicit from his subjects, which possible reflects his own membership within the surveyed community.
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Record #:
30864
Author(s):
Abstract:
Until only a few years ago, few knew much about the first black Marines, or even that they trained in North Carolina. A museum is housed at today’s Camp Johnson in Jacksonville, where the first recruits attended boot camp in the 1940s. At the museum, visitors see what the men’s living quarters looked like, artifacts, and photographs.
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