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8 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 81 Issue 5, Sep/Oct 2017
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Record #:
29613
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When North Carolina’s archery season begins in September, a key factor for bow hunters’ success is deducing what local whitetail deer will be eating. Deer in northeastern North Carolina have a reputation for growing large due to the abundance of crops. Understanding what kind of food deer eat can help hunters determine hunting positions.
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29619
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Ospreys are raptors, or birds of prey, that dive underwater in pursuit of fish. The males also perform an elaborate courtship display, dipping and diving in the air with loud cries while carrying a fish or nesting material to attract a mate. Coastal bird watchers in North Carolina can observe ospreys during their breeding season from early spring through late fall.
Record #:
29614
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The green salamander is North Carolina’s only endangered amphibian, and occurs in small populations in a few of the state’s southwestern mountain counties. In the past twelve years, most green salamander discoveries can be credited to Alan Cameron, a retiree and volunteer for Wildlife Diversity. Cameron has discovered new salamander sites, observed unreported behaviors and rare pigmentation patterns.
Record #:
29617
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Hunters, birders and wildlife watchers should become familiar with the berries that ripen from September through November in North Carolina. A variety of berries are the main soft mast species that many wildlife species consume in the fall. Observing what animals eat and learning about those foods will enhance outdoor experiences.
Record #:
29620
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A wide variety of colors can be found among salamander species in North Carolina. While the hues some salamanders display may be related to species recognition, the colors and patterns of most species have a great deal to do with how they cope with predators. Color can be used as camouflage, mimicry, or a warning.
Record #:
29616
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The second installment in a three-part series about the Mountains-To-Sea Trail focuses on North Carolina’s Piedmont Region, which unlike its Mountain neighbor, is still taking shape. The ability to complete the trail will depend largely on private landowners and their willingness to allow trail easements across their property.
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Record #:
29618
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Tiny holes, pockets and back eddies in North Carolina rivers are likely holding areas for trout because they are good hideouts, receive less fishing pressure, and have slow currents. Pocket-water trout are especially appealing to fishermen because they can approach close without spooking them. This article offers tips on pocket water identification and trout fishing techniques.
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Record #:
29615
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North Carolina has twenty-four public game lands planted with various crops to attract mourning doves and to benefit other wildlife. Christopher Jordan, a game lands and forest resources manager, offers his advice on the best places to dove hunt.
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