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7 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 80 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 2016
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27394
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The Eno River has recently become full of hydrilla verticillata, an invasive species of aquatic weed from South Asia. It grows too plentifully in North Carolina, causing rivers to become sluggish, competing with local species, decreasing oxygen levels in rivers, amongst other things. The leaders of Eno State park are looking for ways to better contain hydrilla, with some success.
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Record #:
27391
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Shaffner talks about his return to fly-fishing for trout on the Cherokee reservation in western North Carolina, where he fished when he was a boy, and good places to fish on the land. Also, the new catch-and release program is explained, as well as the benefits of the program.
Record #:
27393
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Abstract:
The Beaufort County Voice of America radio transmission site from the Cold War is now owned by the Wildlife Resources Commission (WRC) due to it being an outdated form of communication. The WRC is going to make this site into game land to protect the Henslow’s sparrow, a bird endangered in some states, as many live on the land already. The land will also be used for hunting.
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Record #:
27392
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A guide on how to keep one’s hunting dog safe, as well as what to do in emergency situations involving the hunt, explained through some of Marsh’s personal experiences with his hunting dog. He tries to cover most dangers one could face on the hunt with their dog.
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Record #:
27395
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A variety of different types of blinds are used by duck hunters on the Currituck Sound to effectively and comfortably hide from ducks.
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Record #:
27396
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Abstract:
Chimney swifts and their habitats are described, as well as the need for places for them to hibernate. Their old homes of chimneys are becoming more difficult to find, and thus brick towers are now being built to house chimney swifts.
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