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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 80 Issue 2, March/April 2016
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25516
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During the early 1970s, North Carolina joined the Big Tree Program. The goal of the program is to preserve and promote the iconic stature of the trees and educate people about the role they play in sustaining a healthy environment. Each individual state maintains a list of the largest trees found and names them as state champion trees. If the state champion trees are large enough, they may quality for the Register. Currently, there are 31 North Carolina National Champion trees listed on the Register.
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25515
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As North Carolina State Parks turns 100, tourism has grown from 4.2 million visitors in 1972 to 15 million visitors in 2015. The state parks system includes 41 parks and covers 225,537 acres.
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25517
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When fly-fishing in North Carolina and deciding the right fly to tie on, there are a few factors to consider. Beginning anglers should focus on matching imitation flies to real-life sporadic insect hatches, current insect patterns, and the stream conditions. Most importantly, if the fly is not catching fish, do not be afraid to change it.
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Record #:
25518
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Seventy-five percent of the more than 650 North American bird species migrate twice per year. With the help of radio transmitters, scientists know much more about these long journeys.
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34716
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North Carolina hosts approximately 31 National Champion trees listed on the Big Tree Program. Species include the longleaf pine, water oak, flowering dogwood, bald cypress, and silky camellia. Also detailed is the process of finding these champion trees and how two men have added significantly to the list.
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Record #:
34715
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As the North Carolina State Park system reaches its 100th year of service, they reflect back on how they attain their missions of protecting the ecological diversity of the state, educating citizens, and promote recreation. Highlights include the expanded Lake James, the volunteers who have made the program successful, and the Mountains-to-Sea Trail.
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