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8 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 76 Issue 4, July/Aug 2012
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Record #:
16908
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At one time spotted bass were probably native to some stretches of rivers in the western part of the state; however, current populations have been introduced either by wildlife agency stocking programs of the 1970s, or more recently by fishermen. While anglers enjoy the fish's scrappiness, its introduction could have a negative impact on other bass. Ingram examines the state's four geographic reasons to see how spots are affecting other bass populations like large and smallmouth.
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16935
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Christine Kelly, a wildlife diversity biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, is one of nine nationwide recipients of a 2011 Recovery Champion Award given by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for outstanding efforts to preserve endangered species. Kelly was honored for her work with the Northern flying squirrel which is found only in small groups in the state's highest mountains.
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Record #:
16907
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Seventeen-year-old Tyler Shields of Murphy is the new holder of the state record for striped bass. He landed the 66-pound fish March 31, 2012 at Hiawassee. The fish exceeded the old freshwater record by twelve pounds and the state saltwater record by two pounds.
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Record #:
16928
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The state's native cacti are two species of prickly pear. The first is the devil's-tongue, and while it occurs throughout the state, it is most common in the Coastal Plain and Sandhills. The second is the devil's-joint which is restricted to coastal sand dunes and the pinewoods of the state's southern coastal counties.
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Record #:
16930
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The American crow--is it a villain who feasts on cornfields or steals eggs from the nests of other birds. Or does this intelligent, adaptable bird have a more friendly side. Hester examines how attitudes toward this bird have changed over time.
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Record #:
16924
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Smith's article features one of North Carolina's great landmarks--Mount Mitchell--and the creatures that live there--mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles.
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Record #:
17758
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North Carolina offers world class fishing opportunities off the coast due to the influence of the passing Gulf Stream.
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Record #:
16932
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Silverman examines different spider webs, including orb, cobweb, funnel, and sheetweb weavers.
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