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4 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 71 Issue 3, Mar 2007
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Record #:
8653
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In this first of a five-part series, the authors discuss the Wildlife Action Plan, which was created by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to address conservation needs of the state over the next decade. Subsequent articles will discuss how the plan is being implemented in different state regions.
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Record #:
8682
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Highly regarded and used in colonial times by early settlers and Native Americans, the chinquapin faded into obscurity in the 20th-century after the chestnut blight. Capt. John Smith noted the use of the tree by Indians in Virginia, and tribes in North Carolina, including the Cherokee, used the nuts to make flour and the leaves to treat blisters and to make tea to cure headaches. Two pathogens, ink disease and chestnut blight, and an insect, the chestnut gall wasp, arriving from foreign countries, decimated the chinquapin down. In the 21st century, interest in reintroducing the chinquapin to its original range is growing.
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Record #:
8683
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Once covering nine million acres in the eastern United States and Ohio River Valley, the American chestnut was virtually eliminated by an Asian fungus blight in the 1900s. The National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF) and The American Chestnut Foundation (TACF) are working together to plant blight-resistant chestnut trees. The chestnut was an important food source for wild turkeys. The restoration of the chestnut is a long-term project. The new tree in development will have the blight resistance of the Chinese chestnut and the physical appearance of the American chestnut.
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Record #:
8667
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Kibler discusses the work of four North Carolina artisans who combine function and art to create turkey calls. They are Jeff Valentine (Wake Forest); Tony Quarino (Waxhaw); Ed Wynn (Hertford); and Don Carter (Merry Hill). Their calls are either adorned with paintings or constructed of unusual woods that provide a unique look.
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