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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 68 Issue 6, June 2004
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Record #:
6969
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Abstract:
Decisions made today on the state's environment will affect North Carolina far into the future. In this final section of the three-part series on Horizon 2100, conservationists describe what North Carolina could look like in 2100, if aggressive conservation measures were taken. Four statewide strategies, including mitigating the negative effects of human population growth, are discussed.
Record #:
6970
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Abstract:
North Carolina is slowly restoring animals that were largely or entirely extirpated during the last century. Reintroductions include the otter, beaver, elk, wild turkey, and red wolf. The Horizon 2100 plan calls for the reintroduction of the Eastern cougar. This animal is what is called an “apex predator,” or an animal that sits at the top of the food chain. Manuel discusses whether large predators should be brought back into North Carolina and whether they can possibly coexist with people in the twenty-first century.
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Record #:
6974
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Abstract:
Hurricanes in North Carolina affect people and wildlife. Hurricane Isabel, which struck eastern North Carolina in the fall of 2003, decimated the largemouth bass populations in the Roanoke and Chowan rivers. Jenkins describes the North Carolina Resources Commission's plan to restock the two rivers with 12,000 sub-adult largemouth bass. Restocking began in February 2004.
Record #:
6972
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Abstract:
The prothonotary warbler, a brilliantly colored orange-yellow bird with a distinctive song, summers among the state's coastal woodlands, swamps, and rivers, before returning to Central and South America. This bird nests in cavities in small trees in swamps and wet woodlands. Hester describes how to make a warbler house and how the warbler builds its nest and feeds its young.
Record #:
6971
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina waters contain a multitude of fish collectively known as bream. Physical differences are slight, such as shades of color and number of hard rays on the dorsal fin. Habitats, favorite foods, and times of spawning are things that further distinguish them. Kibler describes a number of bream, including the bluegill, shellcracker, redbreast, pumpkinseed, and flier.
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Record #:
6973
Author(s):
Abstract:
Krautwurst relates interesting information about fireflies, including that they are not flies at all. There are around 2,000 firefly species worldwide and about 150 in North America. North Carolina has around 35 firefly species.
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