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6 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 64 Issue 1, Jan 2000
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Record #:
4596
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A $4.3 million grant from the Natural Heritage Trust enabled the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to purchase six additional game lands tracts totaling 14,000 acres. The largest tract was the 5,784-acre Van Swamp located in Beaufort and Washington Counties. Others tracts were located in Hayward, Caldwell, Wilkes, Avery, Rutherford, and Ashe counties. The purchases add land to the game lands program and provide more acreage for hunting, fishing, and recreation.
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Record #:
4602
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The auditorium in the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education near Brevard was named in honor of the late Beatrice H. Barsantee. Born in 1907, Barsantee, a resident of Hendersonville, left one-fourth of her estate to the North Carolina Wildlife Commission for the purpose of conservation education. The money helped start the center, which is now in its fifth year of educating the public about wildlife.
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Record #:
4593
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Bill Holman, who lobbied the state legislature for twenty years on environmental issues, is the new secretary of the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources. Just a few weeks after he took office, Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd battered Eastern North Carolina. In an interview with Lawrence Earley, Holman discusses his environmental agenda for the twenty-first century.
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Record #:
4603
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Retired ornithology professor Thomas L. Quay was honored by North Carolina State University with the naming of the Thomas L. Quay Wildlife and Natural Resources Undergraduate Experimental Learning Award. Quay taught at N.C. State for 32 years, and received one of the first doctoral degrees awarded there in 1948. He was inducted into the North Carolina Wildlife Federation's Conservation Hall of Fame in 1994.
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Record #:
4591
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Not all birds built nests in trees or bushes. Many are satisfied with a hole in a tree trunk. Holes have advantages. They offer more protection from predators, more shelter from the weather, and building skills are not required. Among cavity- dwelling birds are the kestrel, wood duck, belted king fisher, common flicker, and various songbirds.
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Record #:
4590
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As the state of North Carolina moves into the twenty-first century, Nickens takes a look back through the centuries at how humans interacted with the state's wildlife, from 1524, when Verrazano sailed along the coast, to the restoration of the wild turkey in 1999.
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