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5 results for Wildlife in North Carolina Vol. 55 Issue 8, Aug 1991
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Record #:
7902
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It has been 150 years since the last fisher, a large weasel-like mammal, lived in the high southern Appalachians. The animal preys mostly on rabbits, squirrels, birds, and other small animals. The fisher's pelt was highly prized, which led to its disappearance from North Carolina in the 1830s. Now the National Park Service is considering restoring them in the Smoky Mountains National Park. Restoration will depend on whether the fisher will affect the park's small population of endangered northern flying squirrels, an animal fishers are known to eat.
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Record #:
6008
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The Venus's Flytrap is a very rare, insect-eating plant that grows only in a 50-to-75 mile radius of Wilmington. Habitat destruction and intense poaching threaten its survival. On June 1, 2001, the law protecting the plant was strengthened. Minimum fines are now $100 with a maximum of $500 for convicted first offenders. For repeat offenders, the fine can reach $1,000.
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Record #:
7903
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The Transamerica Insurance Company donated 768 acres of wildlife habitat in Hyde County to the North Carolina chapter of the Nature Conservancy. The chapter plans to give the land to the U.S. Department of the Interior for inclusion in the Swan Quarter National Wildlife Refuge, which was established in 1932. Three known federally endangered species are known to inhabit the refuge--bald eagles, peregrine falcons, and American alligators.
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Record #:
6010
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Formed from Tyrrell, Washington, and Hyde Counties, the 110,000-acre Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge is the state's newest refuge. Venters describes the area which, in addition to preserving valuable wetlands, provides an excellent habitat for wintering waterfowl, including tundra swans.
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Record #:
6011
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Since 1984, six wildlife species have been reintroduced to their native range in the Great Smoky Mountains by the National Park Service. In 1991, a family of red wolves was reintroduced into the park. Earley discusses steps taken by the Park Service to win public support for the reintroduction.
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