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10 results for The State Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984
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Record #:
8216
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Lieutenant Roy Wilder, Jr., became a missionary of the North Carolina chitlin faith during World War II. While stationed in London, Wilder received a jar of chitlins from home. With a group of fellow North Carolinians, Wilder cooked the chitlins, creating a unusual smell in the London air. Future N.C. House of Representatives speaker pro tem Allen Barbee, Greenville lawyer William W. Speight, and future Asheville Citizen editor John A. Paris were all present at the chitlin dinner. Following the Normandy invasion, Wilder made a promise to Lindsey Nelson, a future CBS sports reporter, and Don Whitehead, a future Pulitzer Prize reporter, to meet in Germany on Thanksgiving for a chitlin dinner. This did not occur, but Wilder kept his jar of chitlins and met up with the two in March 1945 in Remagen, Germany. There, the trio cooked up a southern meal complemented with champagne, donated by fellow servicemen. Newspapers, Time magazine, the comic strip Pogo, and the Air Force Diary and Magazine reported the chitlin dinner for readers in America. Wilder later sent chitlins to fellow correspondents in Korea and Vietnam.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p15-16, por
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Record #:
8217
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On May 26, 1884, William Joseph Peele asked a group Raleigh's leading citizens to meet him. At this meeting the Watauga Club was born. Membership consisted of local leaders who had not served in the Civil War. This was a dramatic step, because Civil War veterans dominated state politics at the time. The Watauga group established itself to discuss and propose new ideas to answer North Carolina's problems. One topic of discussion was the state's education system. Club members argued that farmers did not have a place to learn the latest farming techniques and economics. They saw a need for a new college devoted to agricultural studies. This meeting paved the way for the building of North Carolina State University.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p16-18, por
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Record #:
8214
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Dino De Laurentiis recently opened a new film studio in Wilmington. Beautiful scenery and non-union labor attracted the film industry to North Carolina. Soon after opening, De Laurentiis completed the movie “Firestarter,” set on the Orton Plantation. Plantation owners complemented the filming crews for taking care of the Orton grounds. The Wilmington studio now consists of five sound stages with more planned. With future investments planned and a good working relationship being built among the local community, Wilmington is becoming the Hollywood of the east.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p12-15, por
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Record #:
8215
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North Carolina used to have a large number of drive-in theatres. Today, few remain. Jeter describes typical drive-in theatres. Usually, drive-ins were located on large flat fields. Some, such as the Carolina Pines were different. This theater, owned by H. A. Carlton, had terraced parking that enabled each row of parked cars to be higher than the row in front. Moviegoers could see a movie for twenty-five cents a person and snacks were cheap.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p14
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Record #:
8212
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Reprinted is a speech given by Senator Ervin at the dedication of the Memorial to the Army and Navy of the Confederate States of America at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1965. Ervin recounts the three day battle adhering to traditional “Lost Cause” rhetoric.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p3, por
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Record #:
8213
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Before electric heaters, country farms were heated by wood stoves. Brinkman writes about a day in his childhood when his family's wood stove blew up. Describing a forgetful hired hand named Red, Brinkman tells how a few forgotten rifle bullets ended up in the wood stove. This caused the explosion.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p11-12, por
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Record #:
8220
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Joseph Montfort was a prominent man in colonial North Carolina. He was a clerk of the Halifax County Court, a member of the North Carolina colonial Assembly, a colonel in the militia, and a treasurer of the northern counties of the colony. In 1771 he was named Provincial Grand Master of America by the English Masonic order, the highest office an American has held in the Masonic organization. Montfort built his home in the town of Halifax on lot 52. This fashionable home existed till 1872, when it burnt down. The site was then covered with dirt and used for cotton farming. In 1972, the lot was found again using C. J. Sauthier's 1769 map. Archaeological excavations on the site began in 1978 and continued in 1979. The original foundation was uncovered, along with 1,600 other artifacts. Today a museum sits over the archaeological site. Visitors can view the foundation and other artifacts as well as tour the thirty-two-acre historic Halifax district.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p22-24, por
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Record #:
8218
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Hippol Castle, better known as Gimghoul Castle, is located in Glandon Forest adjacent to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Built in 1926, the castle is home to UNC's Gimghoul secret society, established by Wray Martin. Legend tells of Peter Dromgoole killed in a dueling contest. Each year, ten upstanding male juniors are chosen to pledge the Gimghoul Society, and past members have included such prominent men as William C. Friday and Frank Porter Graham. During the 1984 Christmas season, Gimghoul Castle, along with neighboring Glandon Forest homes, will be open to the public during the Chapel Hill Preservation Society's Christmas parade of homes. The castle will also be the site of the preservation society's formal Christmas dinner.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p18-19, por
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Record #:
8219
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Snapping turtles are found throughout North Carolina, and there is still a market for turtle meat. The author accompanies several friends who are turtle hunters in Franklin County. The hunters catch turtles by placing in a lake bed a bamboo pole that has a line and hook attached. With any form of meat as bait, the hook is left overnight. The following day the lines are checked and any caught turtles are hauled into a boat. Turtle catchers avoid injuries by handling the animals with care. Turtles are sold while still alive, and those who can stand the danger and smell receive fifty cents per pound for their catch.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p20-21, por
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Record #:
8221
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Maxton, has had several name changes. Originally it was a rail depot between Charlotte and Wilmington. Adopting the name of a local creek, the town first called itself Shoe Heel. This name was changed in 1877 to Tilden, after Democratic presidential candidate Samuel J. Tilden. In 1879 the town's name was mysteriously changed to the Scottish name “Quhele” and then again renamed Shoe Heel in 1881. Finally in 1887, the name Maxton was adopted in reference to the Scottish name prefix “Mac.” This name has remained since then.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 6, Nov 1984, p28-30, por
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