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9 results for The State Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984
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Record #:
8162
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During the First World War, Crestmont became a booming lumber town. Located in the present day Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Crestmont was home to Suncrest Lumber Company employees. The town specialized in milling spruce that was used in war industries. Electricity was cheap and work plentiful. Following the war, however, Suncrest Lumber Company pulled out, taking with them the houses and buildings they had built. A single house remained so that the lumber company could maintain property rights. The author reconnects with her childhood as she locates the old town. Today, all that remains of Crestmont is a single rock chimney.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p2, por
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8161
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Friday, September 26, 1952, Dwight D. Eisenhower rode a train into North Carolina. He made stops is Salisbury, Charlotte, and Winston-Salem. Eisenhower spoke on growing inflation and used a piece of lumber to demonstrate his point. Whistle stop campaigns, like this one, had been an American political tradition, but Eisenhower was the last presidential candidate to participate in a major one.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p3, il
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Record #:
8163
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Folktales play an important role in North Carolina's history. Authors such as John Charles McNeil, Joel Chandler Harris, and Dr. Frank Brown have collected and written about the state's folklore. Focusing on eastern North Carolina, Proctor discusses many of the legends he heard growing up. Folklore topics such as moon cycles, crop planting, animals, love charms, and marriage rituals are treated.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p3, il
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Record #:
8167
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University of Virginia professor Gary Gallagher writes about Stephen Dodson Ramseur and his love Ellen “Nellie” Richmond. Ramseur grew up in Lincolnton and attended the United States Military Academy. He was a member of the last full class to graduate before the Civil War. When war broke out Ramseur resigned his commission and joined the Confederate Army. He quickly rose in rank, becoming the youngest West Point graduate to become a Confederate major general. Ramseur fought at Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Cold Harbor, Shenandoah Valley, and Cedar Creek. Ramseur married Ellen in 1863. On September 16, 1864, he received word that Ellen had given birth to a child, but the message did not describe the baby's sex or health. Ramseur never found out, he was killed in battle two days later at Cedar Creek. Ellen remained in deep mourning the remainder of her life
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p4, il, por
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Record #:
8165
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Following World War II, many North Carolinians wanted a drink of liquor. Many counties, however, enforced dry laws. The need for alcoholic beverages gave rise to the tradition of the mountain moonshiners. The most exciting aspect of the moonshining business was transporting the liquor. Haulers devised new ways to avoid the police. One way was to reinforce a car's rear springs. This kept the car level when hauling a heavy load. When a car was not loaded, the rear springs lifted the car's rear, giving away a hauler's identity. Contrary to popular belief, confrontations between police and moonshiners were usually nonviolent. As counties repealed their dry laws, the demand for illegal alcohol decreased, but the moonshine industry left a legacy of fast cars and high speeds.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p17, 39
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Record #:
8169
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Hurricane Hazel hit eastern North Carolina in October 1954. Rocky Mount native Phyllis Casper recalls her Hazel experience. She and her husband prepared for the worst when hearing of Hazel's approach. Many, including her Aunt Lossie, did not. Schools opened that day, but soon local radio stations told parents to pick up their children. Waiting out the storm in her house, Casper read comic books. Following the storm, residents ventured outside to find a wake of destruction with fallen trees and damaged homes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p2, por
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8168
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During the 1930s and early 1940s, Rusty Williams took his traveling tent show along the east coast. A native of Durham, Williams started each year in Florida and traveled north following the harvest season. His shows included his wife Dot and their two daughters. Usually playing to a packed audience, the Williams family mixed comedy with singing and dancing. Before television's popularity, towns waited all year for the traveling tent show. The Williams family closed the traveling tent show in the late 1940s and settled in Wilson. Rusty Williams became a sheriff deputy and later a court bailiff.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p2, il
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Record #:
8164
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Located in the heart of uptown Charlotte, the Discovery Place is breaking new ground as a hands-on learning center. Over 300,000 visitors have ventured to the Discovery Center, since opening in 1981. The museum features exhibits on exotic animals, chemical reactions, electricity, and weather. The Discovery Place was even selected to host “The Art of the Muppets” exhibit. With over 95,000 students visiting each year, the museum is playing an integral part in teaching North Carolina's children.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p3, por
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Record #:
8166
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Robert “Beau” Hickman grew up in Warrenton, North Carolina. He became well known in Washington D.C. as an enjoyable socialite. Hickman quickly learned to live off his popularity. He charged fees to those who wanted to listen to his stories or enjoy his company. Hickman's story was told in the 1879 booklet Life, Adventures and Anecdotes of ‘Beau' Hickman. After living from his friends' financial support, Hickman died penniless.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p3, il
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