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8 results for The State Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984
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Record #:
8154
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David Stone served in the North Carolina House of Commons, State Supreme Court Judge, U.S. House of Representatives, U.S. Senate, and as Governor of North Carolina from 1810 to 1812. Stone owned Hope Plantation, in Bertie County, and in 1799, he built Rest-Dale Plantation in Wake County. Stone, a successful politician and businessman, chartered the Neuse River Transportation Company that sought to open the Neuse River for water transportation between New Bern and Raleigh. As governor, Stone advocated the use of state funds for social improvements. His primary focus was the development of a public education system, based on the Lancastrian method that would made education available to all students regardless a family's ability to pay tuition.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p3, il, por
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Record #:
8153
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The relationship between Democrat and Republican has long been tense. In this feud, however, there have also been moments that have produced anecdotal humor. Arthur provides small stories from North Carolina politicians and businessmen, such as W. W. Kitchin, Ralph Fisher, and Robert W. Winston. These anecdotes show that in the serious world of politics, humor does exist.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p2, il
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Record #:
8159
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Maggie Valley, incorporated in 1909, is home to various types of people. Miss Jennie Reninger travels every year to spend the summer months enjoying the mountains. Miss Judy Alexander operates the Cataloochee Ranch, where visitors can be treated and entertained in the great outdoors. Father Murphy came to the Maggie Valley from Detroit. Once in the mountains he decided to build a church so he could stay in the area. Kyle Edwards recently opened the Stompin Ground, which is called the “clogging capital of the world.” Visitors wishing to see rare and exotic animals can visit Jim Miller's Soco Gardens Zoo.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p3, por
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Record #:
8158
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The mystery of the Lost Colony continues to fascinate historians. While there is still no evidence explaining the fate of the colony, new evidence has expanded our knowledge of the Roanoke Island colony. Park Ranger Phillip Evans argues that, while there is no evidence proving so, theories on the colony moving to the Chesapeake or to Croatoan Island have merit. Evans also discusses recent archeological findings that challenge previous notions on the village's structure. Excavations of colonial watchtowers in Wolstenholme, VA, match similar findings reached on Roanoke Island, suggesting that similar structures were built in both locations. Evans hopes that through further archeological studies, a greater understanding of the fate of the Roanoke Colony will be obtained.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p19-22, por
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Record #:
8156
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The Cherokee sport of stickball was based on the legend of a game played between animals and birds. The object of the game was to be the first team to score twelve points by putting the leather ball through the opponent's goal. Stickball was usually played between opposing tribes and occasionally served to settle disputes in place of war. Players had few rules to limit their means to win as blows to the head and chest were legal, for example and death was not uncommon. While stickball is still a part of Cherokee culture today, it has been transformed into a less violent activity.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p3, por
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Record #:
8155
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Television came to North Carolina in 1949. In that year, two stations, WFMY-2 in Greensboro and WBTV-3 in Charlotte, began broadcasting. Early television sets were expensive, averaging $300 to $400 per set. Their size was small, too, and they usually had only an 8-foot x 10-foot screen. The television set became a status symbol. While traditional “rabbit ears” could pick up the television signal, many people chose to put up outdoor roof antennas, so their neighbors would know they had a television set. Television had a major impact on North Carolina in introducing a new form of mass media.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p2
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Record #:
8160
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Sim's Country Bar-b-que has become a North Carolina tradition. Located outside of Granite Falls, Sim's opens every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday with bluegrass music and bar-b-que. Sim's is a family-owned business that operates on the family farm. Diners are treated to all-you-can-eat buffets and music. Professional performers such as Doc Watson play at Sim's. Dancers enjoy clogging and square dancing.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p3, por
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Record #:
8157
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The Greensboro Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society recently held a special function for train lovers along the Carolina – Virginia special excursion. The old steam engine Number 611 departed Pomona train station in Greensboro for a round trip voyage to Roanoke, Virginia. During the trip, the train made several stops for photo opportunities. The daylong voyage took train passengers through Greensboro, Danville, Lynchburg, Ruffin, Reidsville, and Brown Summit.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p3, por
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