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7 results for The State Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985
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Record #:
8330
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Abstract:
In April 1985, Greensboro celebrated a week-long festival for the seventy-fifth anniversary of William Sydney Porter's death. Porter, known as O. Henry, was born in Greensboro September 11, 1862. His mother, Mary Virginia Jane Swaim, was the daughter of the Greensboro Patriot's editor. Swaim was influential in Porter's writing career because she encouraged his interest in literature. Porter left Greensboro for Texas in 1890. He was convicted of embezzlement and spent three years in the Ohio State Penitentiary. Porter finally settled in New York City, where he died in 1910. Festival activities in Greensboro included literary competitions, plays, concerts, and exhibits related to O. Henry's short stories.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p11-12, por
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Record #:
8329
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O. Henry, as William Sydney Porter called himself, might have been recorded shortly before his death in 1910. Although some remember hearing him on a radio program celebrating Thomas Edison's birthday, no recording has been uncovered yet. Porter was known to have a pleasing voice, but was shy and reserved. He lived in New York City and spent his days wondering around, observing others. These observations created ideas for his short stories. Porter also wished to remain anonymous, hence his pen name.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p10, por
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Record #:
8328
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There are many ways to tell if it is going to rain besides the newspaper. Folk traditions involve things such as: the direction a lizard sits on a fence post, the location of a spider web, the way fireflies fly, where cows lie down, and cricket songs. The most important predictions are made on July 15, the day honoring St. Swithin's, the patron saint of the farmer. Current weather phenomena might also predict future weather. It is said, for example, fog on a southerly wind will bring rain, while halos around the sun foretell stormy weather.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p8-9, por
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Record #:
8331
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Abstract:
Along the Blue Ridge Parkway in Alleghany County, a cabin sits below the Doughton Park lookout. This cabin was the home of the Caudill family at the beginning of the 20th-century. Martin Caudill settled in the Wildcat Rock area after the Civil War, and with his wife raised 22 children.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p13-14, por
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Record #:
8332
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Soldiers spent very little time in actual combat during the Civil War. Most of their time, particularly during winter camp, they spent staving off boredom. Neither the Confederate or Federal governments invested in recreational or educational activities for their soldiers. One outlet soldiers found was singing. During the period, 1861-1865, over 500 songs were written and published as sheet music. Songs such as “The Shiloh Victory,” “Manassas Polka,” “Sumpter, A Battle of 1861,” and “Home, Sweet Home” gained popularity during the war. At times, both sides engaged in singing duels across the lines with each side trying to sing louder than the other, while other times both sides would join and sing together. Regiments formed glee clubs and bands, with some members gaining fame. One famous soldier-musician was Sidney Lanier. He was a popular flutist who later became the first flutist of the Peabody Symphony Orchestra. Lanier also gained fame as a writer.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p16-18, il
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Record #:
8333
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In 1982 the East Carolina Chapter of the National Railway Historical Society became the new owners of a six-mile rail spur in Wake County. The society bought the line after the Southern Railway closed it down. Southern Railway assisted the society by selling the line at scrap value. The rail line was named The New Hope Valley Railway and it runs from Bonsal to New Hill. The railway society has also purchased rolling stock that include two engines, a porter car, two cabooses, two flat cars, two freight cars, and an old Southern Postal car. The society holds workdays for its members one Saturday a month. On these days maintenance work is completed by the members themselves. About twice a year the rail line is open to the public for rail demonstrations. The society hopes that through donations and fund raising activities the railway will become permanently open to the public as a museum.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p20-22, por
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Record #:
8334
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Abstract:
Hinkle uncovered a copy of his grandmother's The New Dixie Cook Book published in 1896. This book gave details on how a housewife could maintain a clean home and a well run kitchen. The book included directions on how to make homemade soaps and suggested using chemicals such as iron sulfate, sprinkled on a clean floor to prevent malarial exhalations. Suggestions were also made about the husband's role in moving heavy objects for cleaning. The book finally suggested that women not work themselves too hard and that they take time to rest and count their blessings.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p24, il
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