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7 results for The State Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984
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Record #:
8072
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During the Great Depression, the United States government provided funds through the Public Works Administration to hire unemployed workers. One program funded by the PWA was the Federal Arts Program. In 1940, the Federal Arts program commissioned Simka Simkovitch to paint four murals in the new Beaufort post office. These four paintings depicted the Town of Beaufort's heritage and included pictures of wild horses, Canadian geese, the “Orville W” and the Beaufort lifesavers rescuing members of the “Crissie Wright.” While the murals are today a part of Beaufort, local residents have no memory of the Russian artist. Commissioned to paint these scenes, Simkovitch spent only a few days in Beaufort before returning to his studio in Connecticut, later sending the paintings back to Beaufort.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984, p14-15, il, por
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Record #:
8071
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Northwest Davidson County was the sight of Yadkin College. Founded by Henry Walser, the Methodist Protestant Church opened the doors to Yadkin College in 1856. Yearly commencement services provided both students and the local community with two days of entertainment. Attendees enjoyed the excitement of sermons, speeches, contests, literary presentations and promenades. Yadkin College opened as a male institution but became co-educational in 1878.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984, p11-12, il, por
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Record #:
8070
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Confederate armies struck fear among Union ranks with the infamous Rebel Yell. The Rebel Yell was a distinctive sound made by Confederate soldiers during the heat of battle. Letters written by Wilmington native and soldier Thomas Wood described the Rebel Yell as a noise that could not be duplicated by Yankee soldiers. Kentuckian Kellar Anderson discussed in The Confederate Veteran on what occasions the Rebel Yell was given and how it could never be duplicated beyond the heat of battle. An accurate version of the Rebel Yell can no longer be heard.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984, p9-10, il, por
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Record #:
8073
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Moore County was once considered the “Dewberry Capital of the World.” Today that is no longer true. Moore Country residents experienced the height of dewberry cultivation during the 1920s. During that decade, $30,000 to $60,000 dollars a day in dewberries were sold during the peak season. By the 1970s the crop had disappeared from the Moore County hillsides. Competition from mechanized farming in the Pacific Northwest pushed out the North Carolina dewberry farmer.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984, p16, il
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Record #:
8074
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The Great Philadelphia Wagon Road served as a main north-–south thoroughfare in Colonial America. Prior to English settlement, Iroquois tribes used the road as a trading route. A portion of the Wagon Road can still be found on William H. McGee's farm in Stokes County. As Stokes County Historical Council president, McGee is directing a project to retrace the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road through North Carolina. This project is sponsored by the North Carolina Quadricentennial Anniversary Committee. Along with other projects, such as the building of the Elizabeth II and the excavation of the Lost Colony on Roanoke Island, the North Carolina Quadricentennial Anniversary Committee is attempting to call attention to the first English settlements in America.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984, p17-19, por
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Record #:
8075
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In Saluda, North Carolina, Ann and Ken Hough have renovated an old house that once belonged to the Southern Railway. Now named the Orchard Inn, Ann and Ken have created a cozy mountain retreat. The Orchard Inn provides guests with a quiet and relaxing place to enjoy themselves. The inn also provides its guest with a delectable menu. In the town of Saluda, visitors may visit the local general store or seek antique treasures. The Saluda Association brings local artists and craftsmen together to sell their works to area visitors.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984, p20-22, por
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Record #:
8076
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Buckland Plantation played an important role in Gates County's early history. Dating from the early 1700s, Buckland Plantation grew to over 3,000 acres and had over 100 slaves working its fields. Following a succession of several owners, Buckland Plantation shrank in size. Today, the Buckland home is in disrepair. Plans are under way to begin restoration
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 1, June 1984, p23, por
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