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8 results for The State Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984
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Record #:
8370
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Abstract:
Warren Wilson College, located about ten miles east of Asheville near Swannanoa, is a unique four-year coeducational college which boasts a wide variety of ethnic groups. It was founded ninety years ago by the United Presbyterian Church as the Asheville Mountain Farm School For Boys. The 460 students also work fifteen hours a week learning carpentry, electrical work, plumbing, landscaping, painting, cooking, office skills, gardening, forestry, and photography. The 1,070-acre campus is becoming self-sufficient because students maintain a 300-acre farm located on the campus.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p10, 11, por
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Record #:
8377
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Abstract:
Simon Ferdinando was arrested in 1578 and tried for piracy. Later that year he was taken from prison, and, because of his superb nautical talents, was employed to accompany Sir Humphrey Gilbert on the first voyage to exploit America for England. In 1580, Ferdinando explored the coastline of North America and guided colonial expeditions, some to the North Carolina coast. What is now Oregon Inlet used to be named “Port Ferdinando.” Ferdinando became master and pilot of the ship which carried Sir Walter Raleigh's agents to Carolina and back. When he grew too old to go to sea he became an advisor to the newly chartered East India Company.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p12, por
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Record #:
8387
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The original Cloudland Hotel, a twenty-room room log structure atop Roan Mountain, was constructed in 1879 by L. B. Searle of Chattanooga, TN. After a fire in 1880 destroyed the resort, the landowner, General John Thomas Wilder, replaced the log cabin with a 166-room hostelry, built on the North Carolina/Tennessee line. Wilder called it “The Great Southern Resort for Hay Fever” and said its mountain air, at a more than 6,000-foot elevation, and its fresh cold water helped people with respiratory problems. This drew visitors from all over the country for two decades. Its doors closed in 1903 and the hotel was demolished in 1919. Only the foundation remains.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p12, 13, por
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Record #:
8389
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In 1916, Jacques Busbee and his wife providing a market by selling North Carolina Pottery in their New York City tearoom. In 1922, Jacques opened Jugtown Pottery in Moore County to train and encourage younger local potters. As well as producing traditional wares of the region, such as whisky jugs, storage jars, and pie dishes, he began introducing more decorative vases based on Chinese and Korean forms he found in museums and library books. The tremendous success of Jugtown Pottery led to the revival of production among other potters in the Moore County area. Jacques Busbee died in 1947, and the Jacques Busbee Memorial Collection later became part of the North Carolina Museum of Art.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p16, 64, por
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Record #:
9584
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Wild boars were introduced in North Carolina in 1912 when a shipment of twelve boars arrived at a hunting lodge near Robbinsville. By 1920, the original number had grown to over one hundred. Several escaped their pens and spread into the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. U.S. Forest Service officials sponsored several hunting expeditions to kill the wild boards because of their threat to native wildlife. Their population has been reduced, but it has not been eradicated.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p14-15, il, map
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Record #:
9583
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Core Sound lies along the North Carolina coast near Beaufort. Although it is nearly twenty-eight miles in length, it is rarely more than three miles wide. The hustle and bustle of today's tourist industry has bypassed many of Core Sound's communities, such as Davis and Atlantic; thus they provide a glimpse into old-time coastal living. Boating through Core Sound can be dangerous as most of the sound's waterways are only a few feet deep.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p7-9, il, map
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Record #:
9586
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The Wilmington Railroad Museum, which focuses on the history of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad, recently opened. When the line began operation in 1835, it was the world's longest railroad. The line has changed names several times, finally becoming the Atlantic Coast Line in 1900. The museum is located in a warehouse built by the railroad in 1876. Exhibits include a train caboose, a model train set, and the Wilmington and Weldon arrival bell.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p19-20, il
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Record #:
9585
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Abstract:
Melvin recalls her visits with Jacques and Juliana Busbee of Moore County, who made pottery in their home in Jugtown. She began visiting the Busbee's pottery operation as a college student during the 1930s. Details such as the Busbee's cabin interior, personalities, pottery produced, and business operations are described. While the Busbees are no longer living, Jugtown pottery is still being crafted by workers such as Ben Owens, who was taught the pottery craft by the Busbees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 12, May 1984, p17-18, il, por
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